Lean psoas area does not correlate with clinical outcomes in moderately to severely injured older people

Lean psoas area does not correlate with clinical outcomes in moderately to severely injured older... Policy ImpactThis article demonstrates that the outcomes of acute geriatric trauma are best predicted by the severity of the trauma. Management as guided by the clinical scenario is appropriate, and no change to policy is suggested from the outcome of this article.Practice ImpactThis retrospective cohort study reiterates the need for further research to develop an objective measure of frailty in our older patients to assist with a more clinically oriented decision‐making process for patient care.IntroductionAs Australia's population continues to age, the number of older people suffering trauma is also increasing. Tools that assist in predicting outcome in the trauma setting would allow appropriate management of these patients, including decisions involving operative intervention, disposition and counselling of these patients.Chronologic age is used to define physiologic vulnerability. However, there is a wide variation in the age at which individuals begin to deteriorate physiologically. In 2004, Shah and co‐workers found no difference in functional outcomes based solely on age in patients undergoing rehabilitation .The University of Arizona demonstrated that in the trauma setting, a Frailty Index (FI) was a superior and more reliable indicator of outcome, compared with chronological age . Frailty can be defined as a state of low physiologic reserve http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australasian Journal on Ageing Wiley

Lean psoas area does not correlate with clinical outcomes in moderately to severely injured older people

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/lean-psoas-area-does-not-correlate-with-clinical-outcomes-in-lFzEloU3af
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 AJA Inc.
ISSN
1440-6381
eISSN
1741-6612
D.O.I.
10.1111/ajag.12482
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Policy ImpactThis article demonstrates that the outcomes of acute geriatric trauma are best predicted by the severity of the trauma. Management as guided by the clinical scenario is appropriate, and no change to policy is suggested from the outcome of this article.Practice ImpactThis retrospective cohort study reiterates the need for further research to develop an objective measure of frailty in our older patients to assist with a more clinically oriented decision‐making process for patient care.IntroductionAs Australia's population continues to age, the number of older people suffering trauma is also increasing. Tools that assist in predicting outcome in the trauma setting would allow appropriate management of these patients, including decisions involving operative intervention, disposition and counselling of these patients.Chronologic age is used to define physiologic vulnerability. However, there is a wide variation in the age at which individuals begin to deteriorate physiologically. In 2004, Shah and co‐workers found no difference in functional outcomes based solely on age in patients undergoing rehabilitation .The University of Arizona demonstrated that in the trauma setting, a Frailty Index (FI) was a superior and more reliable indicator of outcome, compared with chronological age . Frailty can be defined as a state of low physiologic reserve

Journal

Australasian Journal on AgeingWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off