Lead levels in deciduous teeth in relation to tooth type and tissue as well as to maternal behavior and selected individual environmental parameters of children

Lead levels in deciduous teeth in relation to tooth type and tissue as well as to maternal... In contrast to the blood lead level, which is an effective indicator of current exposure, the concentration of lead in the teeth is a measure of internal exposure in the past and low‐level chronic exposure. Our measurements show that lead concentrations depend in a complex manner on both the part and the type of tooth. We highlight a variety of risk factors of long‐term lead exposure: involuntary smoking (including by expecting mothers), the type and duration of the way to school (the effect of traffic), how children play, the individual environment (housing conditions), and other factors. ©1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Environ Toxicol 14: 439–454, 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Toxicology Wiley

Lead levels in deciduous teeth in relation to tooth type and tissue as well as to maternal behavior and selected individual environmental parameters of children

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
1520-4081
eISSN
1522-7278
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1522-7278(199912)14:5<439::AID-TOX1>3.0.CO;2-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In contrast to the blood lead level, which is an effective indicator of current exposure, the concentration of lead in the teeth is a measure of internal exposure in the past and low‐level chronic exposure. Our measurements show that lead concentrations depend in a complex manner on both the part and the type of tooth. We highlight a variety of risk factors of long‐term lead exposure: involuntary smoking (including by expecting mothers), the type and duration of the way to school (the effect of traffic), how children play, the individual environment (housing conditions), and other factors. ©1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Environ Toxicol 14: 439–454, 1999

Journal

Environmental ToxicologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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