Laterality of Hand Function in Tufted Capuchin Monkeys ( Cebus apella ): Comparison between Tool Use Actions and Spontaneous Non‐tool Actions

Laterality of Hand Function in Tufted Capuchin Monkeys ( Cebus apella ): Comparison between Tool... This study examined hand preference for tool use and spontaneous non‐tool actions in tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). We noted a lack of lateral bias across measures, and greater strength of hand preference for tool use than for self‐directed or feeding activities. Animals that used tools exhibited a population‐level right‐hand bias for self‐touching whereas animals that did not use tools exhibited a lack of lateral bias for this measure. Our findings are consistent with views that hand preference is expressed more strongly for tool use than for non‐tool activities, and that lateral bias for self‐directed behavior is related to problem‐solving skills in primates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethology Wiley

Laterality of Hand Function in Tufted Capuchin Monkeys ( Cebus apella ): Comparison between Tool Use Actions and Spontaneous Non‐tool Actions

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1998 Blackwell Verlag
ISSN
0179-1613
eISSN
1439-0310
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1439-0310.1998.tb00056.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined hand preference for tool use and spontaneous non‐tool actions in tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). We noted a lack of lateral bias across measures, and greater strength of hand preference for tool use than for self‐directed or feeding activities. Animals that used tools exhibited a population‐level right‐hand bias for self‐touching whereas animals that did not use tools exhibited a lack of lateral bias for this measure. Our findings are consistent with views that hand preference is expressed more strongly for tool use than for non‐tool activities, and that lateral bias for self‐directed behavior is related to problem‐solving skills in primates.

Journal

EthologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1998

References

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