Late Quaternary cycles of mangrove development and decline on the north Australian continental shelf

Late Quaternary cycles of mangrove development and decline on the north Australian continental shelf Mangrove communities in the Australian tropics presently occur as narrow belts of vegetation in estuaries and on sheltered, muddy coasts. Palynological data from continental‐shelf and deep‐sea cores indicate a long‐term cyclical component of mangrove development and decline at a regional scale, which can be linked to specific phases of late Quaternary sea‐level change. Extensive mangrove development, relative to today, occurs during periods of marine transgression, whereas very diminished mangrove occurs during marine regressions and during rarer periods of relative sea‐level stability. Episodes of flourishing mangrove cannot be linked to phases of humid climate, as has been suggested in studies elsewhere. Rather, the cycle of expansion and decline of mangrove communities on a grand scale is explained in terms of contrasting physiographic settings characteristic of continental‐shelf coasts during transgressive and regressive phases, in particular by the existence, or lack, of well‐developed tidal estuaries. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Quaternary Science Wiley

Late Quaternary cycles of mangrove development and decline on the north Australian continental shelf

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0267-8179
eISSN
1099-1417
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1099-1417(199908)14:5<465::AID-JQS473>3.0.CO;2-E
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mangrove communities in the Australian tropics presently occur as narrow belts of vegetation in estuaries and on sheltered, muddy coasts. Palynological data from continental‐shelf and deep‐sea cores indicate a long‐term cyclical component of mangrove development and decline at a regional scale, which can be linked to specific phases of late Quaternary sea‐level change. Extensive mangrove development, relative to today, occurs during periods of marine transgression, whereas very diminished mangrove occurs during marine regressions and during rarer periods of relative sea‐level stability. Episodes of flourishing mangrove cannot be linked to phases of humid climate, as has been suggested in studies elsewhere. Rather, the cycle of expansion and decline of mangrove communities on a grand scale is explained in terms of contrasting physiographic settings characteristic of continental‐shelf coasts during transgressive and regressive phases, in particular by the existence, or lack, of well‐developed tidal estuaries. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Journal of Quaternary ScienceWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1999

References

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