Late Pleistocene behavioural variation and time trends: the case from Tasmania

Late Pleistocene behavioural variation and time trends: the case from Tasmania The newly discovered archaeological site of Parmerpar Meethaner, located in the Forth River valley Tasmania, is described. This important site, 1) has evidence of repeated long term human occupation extending from c.780 BP to c.34,000 BP, 2) crosses all the major large scale climatic events such as the beginning, middle and end of the LGM and the late Pleistocene/Holocene boundary, 3) supports the notion that Tasmania was first occupied 35,000 radiocarbon years ago, 4) has a different settlement history to sites in Southwest Tasmania, and 5) provides the missing archaeological evidence of human responses to changing forested conditions. The paper describes the material from Parmerpar Meethaner and examines how they fit with what is currently known about late Pleistocene Tasmanian occupation in terms of dating patterns of discard behaviour, Bass Strait landbridges and colonising events. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archaeology in Oceania Wiley

Late Pleistocene behavioural variation and time trends: the case from Tasmania

Archaeology in Oceania, Volume 30 (3) – Oct 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/late-pleistocene-behavioural-variation-and-time-trends-the-case-from-PpYra1VXrD
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1995 The University of Sydney
ISSN
0003-8121
eISSN
1834-4453
DOI
10.1002/j.1834-4453.1995.tb00333.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The newly discovered archaeological site of Parmerpar Meethaner, located in the Forth River valley Tasmania, is described. This important site, 1) has evidence of repeated long term human occupation extending from c.780 BP to c.34,000 BP, 2) crosses all the major large scale climatic events such as the beginning, middle and end of the LGM and the late Pleistocene/Holocene boundary, 3) supports the notion that Tasmania was first occupied 35,000 radiocarbon years ago, 4) has a different settlement history to sites in Southwest Tasmania, and 5) provides the missing archaeological evidence of human responses to changing forested conditions. The paper describes the material from Parmerpar Meethaner and examines how they fit with what is currently known about late Pleistocene Tasmanian occupation in terms of dating patterns of discard behaviour, Bass Strait landbridges and colonising events.

Journal

Archaeology in OceaniaWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1995

References

  • Chronology and explanation in western Victoria and south‐east South Australia
    Bird, Bird; Frankel, Frankel
  • Bushfires in Tasmania: a botanical approach to anthropological questions
    Bowman, Bowman; Brown, Brown
  • Cyclical patterns in the Pleistocene human occupation of Southwest Tasmania
    Holdaway, Holdaway; Porch, Porch
  • Excavations at Mackintosh 90/1 in western Tasmania: a discussion of stratigraphy, chronology and site formation
    Stern, Stern; Marshall, Marshall

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off