Laryngeal candidiasis: Our experience from sixty biopsy specimens

Laryngeal candidiasis: Our experience from sixty biopsy specimens KeypointsCandidiasis was found in a number of laryngeal biopsy specimens tested. These patients had no reported visual evidence of candidiasis on laryngoscopy.Laryngeal candidiasis was more commonly identified in the pathology samples of those with documented use of inhaled corticosteroid therapy (20%) than those without documented use (10%).Local discussion between otolaryngologists and pathologists on the testing of laryngeal samples for candidiasis is required to ensure appropriate investigations are performed in a standardised manner.INTRODUCTIONPersistent throat symptoms, such as dysphonia, globus and throat pain, are highly prevalent and are a significant cause of morbidity. In a number of cases, a clear cause of these symptoms is not identified, and many patients are treated empirically with lifestyle advice and/or anti‐reflux medication.There is an increasing frequency of respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with associated increased use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a well‐recognised complication of ICS, particularly when inhaler technique and oropharyngeal hygiene are poor. There is, however, limited evidence on the prevalence of laryngeal candidiasis in those taking ICS. While clinical diagnosis is sometimes possible, it has been highlighted in oropharyngeal candidiasis that clinical findings do not always correlate with the presence of fungi.We hypothesised http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Otolaryngology Wiley

Laryngeal candidiasis: Our experience from sixty biopsy specimens

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1749-4478
eISSN
1749-4486
D.O.I.
10.1111/coa.13034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

KeypointsCandidiasis was found in a number of laryngeal biopsy specimens tested. These patients had no reported visual evidence of candidiasis on laryngoscopy.Laryngeal candidiasis was more commonly identified in the pathology samples of those with documented use of inhaled corticosteroid therapy (20%) than those without documented use (10%).Local discussion between otolaryngologists and pathologists on the testing of laryngeal samples for candidiasis is required to ensure appropriate investigations are performed in a standardised manner.INTRODUCTIONPersistent throat symptoms, such as dysphonia, globus and throat pain, are highly prevalent and are a significant cause of morbidity. In a number of cases, a clear cause of these symptoms is not identified, and many patients are treated empirically with lifestyle advice and/or anti‐reflux medication.There is an increasing frequency of respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with associated increased use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Oropharyngeal candidiasis is a well‐recognised complication of ICS, particularly when inhaler technique and oropharyngeal hygiene are poor. There is, however, limited evidence on the prevalence of laryngeal candidiasis in those taking ICS. While clinical diagnosis is sometimes possible, it has been highlighted in oropharyngeal candidiasis that clinical findings do not always correlate with the presence of fungi.We hypothesised

Journal

Clinical OtolaryngologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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