Judge Don E. Long Leaves Oregon Juvenile Court Bench

Judge Don E. Long Leaves Oregon Juvenile Court Bench OCTOBER, 1963 - VOL. 14, No. 3 PAGE 61 STATE DEVELOPMENT Don E. Long Leaves Oregon SECTION Judge Juvenile Court Juvenile Court Bench Judges Journal FALL ISSUE OCTOBER, 1963 VOL. 14, No. 3 through the first two years of law school at Georgetown One of the most distinguished juvenile court judges in University. the country, Judge Donald E. Long of Portland, Oregon will During the Pancho Villa difficulty, he rode westward retire at the end of October as Presiding Judge of the De- with cavalry troops from Washington to Mexico, then re- partment of Domestic Relations, Multnomah Circuit Court. turned to Washington, was commissioned and went overseas Judge Long has served in that court for 27 years. during World War I and served 14 months in France. The feelings of the National Council of Juvenile Court After the Army he joined the FBI to spend a couple of Judges were aptly expressed in a letter written to Judge years in various parts of the United States and then resumed Long by the President of the National Council of Juvenile the study of law, finally graduating from Georgetown. He Court Judges, Judge Joseph B. Felton, from neighboring returned to Oregon where he practiced law for a decade Salem, Oregon. before being appointed as a Portland Municipal Judge. He ‘We in the National Council of Juvenile Court Judges,” resigned in 1936 to run for the court, winning the election. Judge Felton pointed out, “are proud that you are a member When World War I1 began, Judge Long joined the Third of and have long been identified with the National Council Infantry Division for 18 months, receiving the Bronze Star and grateful for the strong leadership you so generously and Purple Heart medals, leaving the service as a lieutenant and effectively gave the Council as it approached maturity colonel after he was wounded in northern France. and national stature.” In civilian clothes he pursued judicial and civic duties Judge Felton observed that it was with deep satisfaction and collected an armful of citations and awards, including that Judge Long can reflect on the many years of dedicated a most effectual year, 1954-1955, as President of the Na- service with opportunities to help troubled families and tional Council of Juvenile Court Judges. children. These years were filled with many disappoint- He is married, the father of three children and has a ments and frustrations, yet years full of success, achieve- hobby-riding horseback. Sometimes he rides as much as ment and national recognition. two hours e day in central Oregon, driving there from his Judge Long, at a press conference when he announced office in the court house. his approaching retirement, was asked what kind of a judge he believed himself to be. After a moment of reflection, he Joseph B. Felton Home, replied, “An understanding judge.” He said that he had listened to thousands of divorce cases Name of Salem Facility involving thousands of children, attemDted to treat such A crowd of 300 people were on hand Saturday, July 13, conflict individually and once he had demed a case, he tor the opening of the new Marion County Juvenile Court never had any regrets. Center and Joseph B. Felton Home at Salem, Oregon. At the same news conference the judge spoke about his Judge Felton, President of the National Council of Juve- chief professional concern, “The American Family.” nile Court Judges, and a leader in not only Oregon Juvenile Court programs and activities but also nationally, was hon- Personal Family Happy ored as the new Marion County Juvenile Court Center was His own personal family has been a very happy one. He named in his honor in a surprise announcement which came stated that he had developed a faculty for survival through during the ceremonies opening the new $375,000 facility. the anguish of domestic relations and juvenile courts by Official name of the building was announced by Rex doing the best he could, waiting for the last piece of evi- Hartley, Chairman of the Marion County Board of Com- dence and then deciding. missioners, as the Marion County Juvenile Court Center Man and woman wanting to marry should be emotionally and Joseph B. Felton Home. mature, sbould have a common objective, should be rela- Judge Felton received a warm ovation from the esti- tively free of personality conflicts, should enjoy things to- mated 300 persons attending the dedication as the announce- gether, should come from similar backgrounds and should ment was made. be patient with one another, Judge Long believed. There are separate rooms for 12 boys and 6 girls. Other Also, he said that he believed the word “cohesive” best key parts of the new structure include social and recreation described the central characteristic of a successful family. areas for youths, library, classroom, crafts room, hearing “I hardly ever had a Japanese, Chinese or Jewish family courtroom and judge’s chambers. in court,” he said. This is because there is cohesiveness and The office wing of the structure contains offices for eight discipline-too many American parents today lose control counselors, conference and administrative areas, kitchen, of their children and the youngsters rapidly become way- interview rooms and a special intake area. ward. Authority at home, attention, love-are factors which Authorization for the youth center was given by Marion create a base for a responsible, mature and happy adulthood. County voters in 1960 with approval of a two-year $375,000 Judge Long, age 70 on September 13, was born in Will- serial levy. apa, Washington. His family moved to Hillsboro during his Circuit Judge Donald E. Long of Portland headed the list of speakers and others on the program included Judge first year and he grew up there, his father being editor and publisher of the Hillsboro Argus. From Hillsboro he jour- Felton, Chairman Rex Hartley of the Marion County Board neyed East to New York and then Washington where, of Commissioners, Mrs. William C. Crothers and W. Dave through the efforts of his father, he got a job in the Senate Williams, present and past chairman, respectively, of the wing of the Capitol as a detective and worked his way Juvenile Court Advisory Council. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Juvenile and Family Court Journal Wiley

Judge Don E. Long Leaves Oregon Juvenile Court Bench

Juvenile and Family Court Journal, Volume 14 (3) – Oct 1, 1963

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1963 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0161-7109
eISSN
1755-6988
DOI
10.1111/j.1755-6988.1963.tb00274.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

OCTOBER, 1963 - VOL. 14, No. 3 PAGE 61 STATE DEVELOPMENT Don E. Long Leaves Oregon SECTION Judge Juvenile Court Juvenile Court Bench Judges Journal FALL ISSUE OCTOBER, 1963 VOL. 14, No. 3 through the first two years of law school at Georgetown One of the most distinguished juvenile court judges in University. the country, Judge Donald E. Long of Portland, Oregon will During the Pancho Villa difficulty, he rode westward retire at the end of October as Presiding Judge of the De- with cavalry troops from Washington to Mexico, then re- partment of Domestic Relations, Multnomah Circuit Court. turned to Washington, was commissioned and went overseas Judge Long has served in that court for 27 years. during World War I and served 14 months in France. The feelings of the National Council of Juvenile Court After the Army he joined the FBI to spend a couple of Judges were aptly expressed in a letter written to Judge years in various parts of the United States and then resumed Long by the President of the National Council of Juvenile the study of law, finally graduating from Georgetown. He Court Judges, Judge Joseph B. Felton, from neighboring returned to Oregon where he practiced law for a decade Salem, Oregon. before being appointed as a Portland Municipal Judge. He ‘We in the National Council of Juvenile Court Judges,” resigned in 1936 to run for the court, winning the election. Judge Felton pointed out, “are proud that you are a member When World War I1 began, Judge Long joined the Third of and have long been identified with the National Council Infantry Division for 18 months, receiving the Bronze Star and grateful for the strong leadership you so generously and Purple Heart medals, leaving the service as a lieutenant and effectively gave the Council as it approached maturity colonel after he was wounded in northern France. and national stature.” In civilian clothes he pursued judicial and civic duties Judge Felton observed that it was with deep satisfaction and collected an armful of citations and awards, including that Judge Long can reflect on the many years of dedicated a most effectual year, 1954-1955, as President of the Na- service with opportunities to help troubled families and tional Council of Juvenile Court Judges. children. These years were filled with many disappoint- He is married, the father of three children and has a ments and frustrations, yet years full of success, achieve- hobby-riding horseback. Sometimes he rides as much as ment and national recognition. two hours e day in central Oregon, driving there from his Judge Long, at a press conference when he announced office in the court house. his approaching retirement, was asked what kind of a judge he believed himself to be. After a moment of reflection, he Joseph B. Felton Home, replied, “An understanding judge.” He said that he had listened to thousands of divorce cases Name of Salem Facility involving thousands of children, attemDted to treat such A crowd of 300 people were on hand Saturday, July 13, conflict individually and once he had demed a case, he tor the opening of the new Marion County Juvenile Court never had any regrets. Center and Joseph B. Felton Home at Salem, Oregon. At the same news conference the judge spoke about his Judge Felton, President of the National Council of Juve- chief professional concern, “The American Family.” nile Court Judges, and a leader in not only Oregon Juvenile Court programs and activities but also nationally, was hon- Personal Family Happy ored as the new Marion County Juvenile Court Center was His own personal family has been a very happy one. He named in his honor in a surprise announcement which came stated that he had developed a faculty for survival through during the ceremonies opening the new $375,000 facility. the anguish of domestic relations and juvenile courts by Official name of the building was announced by Rex doing the best he could, waiting for the last piece of evi- Hartley, Chairman of the Marion County Board of Com- dence and then deciding. missioners, as the Marion County Juvenile Court Center Man and woman wanting to marry should be emotionally and Joseph B. Felton Home. mature, sbould have a common objective, should be rela- Judge Felton received a warm ovation from the esti- tively free of personality conflicts, should enjoy things to- mated 300 persons attending the dedication as the announce- gether, should come from similar backgrounds and should ment was made. be patient with one another, Judge Long believed. There are separate rooms for 12 boys and 6 girls. Other Also, he said that he believed the word “cohesive” best key parts of the new structure include social and recreation described the central characteristic of a successful family. areas for youths, library, classroom, crafts room, hearing “I hardly ever had a Japanese, Chinese or Jewish family courtroom and judge’s chambers. in court,” he said. This is because there is cohesiveness and The office wing of the structure contains offices for eight discipline-too many American parents today lose control counselors, conference and administrative areas, kitchen, of their children and the youngsters rapidly become way- interview rooms and a special intake area. ward. Authority at home, attention, love-are factors which Authorization for the youth center was given by Marion create a base for a responsible, mature and happy adulthood. County voters in 1960 with approval of a two-year $375,000 Judge Long, age 70 on September 13, was born in Will- serial levy. apa, Washington. His family moved to Hillsboro during his Circuit Judge Donald E. Long of Portland headed the list of speakers and others on the program included Judge first year and he grew up there, his father being editor and publisher of the Hillsboro Argus. From Hillsboro he jour- Felton, Chairman Rex Hartley of the Marion County Board neyed East to New York and then Washington where, of Commissioners, Mrs. William C. Crothers and W. Dave through the efforts of his father, he got a job in the Senate Williams, present and past chairman, respectively, of the wing of the Capitol as a detective and worked his way Juvenile Court Advisory Council.

Journal

Juvenile and Family Court JournalWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1963

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