JOB SEARCH BEHAVIOR OF EMPLOYED MANAGERS

JOB SEARCH BEHAVIOR OF EMPLOYED MANAGERS Job search typically has been thought of as an antecedent to voluntary turnover or job choice. This study extends existing literature by proposing a model of the job search process and examining the search behavior of 1,388 employed managers. Managers were surveyed about their job search and voluntary turnover activities. Survey data were matched with job, organizational, and personal information contained in the data base of a large executive search firm. Results suggest that job satisfaction, compensation, and perceptions of organizational success were negatively related to job search, while desire for more work‐family balance and ambition exhibited positive relations with search. Perceptions of greener pastures did not have much effect on job search among this group. Results also indicated that although some job search activity does facilitate turnover, a considerable amount of search does not lead to turnover. Thus, it appears that search serves many purposes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1994.tb01725.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Job search typically has been thought of as an antecedent to voluntary turnover or job choice. This study extends existing literature by proposing a model of the job search process and examining the search behavior of 1,388 employed managers. Managers were surveyed about their job search and voluntary turnover activities. Survey data were matched with job, organizational, and personal information contained in the data base of a large executive search firm. Results suggest that job satisfaction, compensation, and perceptions of organizational success were negatively related to job search, while desire for more work‐family balance and ambition exhibited positive relations with search. Perceptions of greener pastures did not have much effect on job search among this group. Results also indicated that although some job search activity does facilitate turnover, a considerable amount of search does not lead to turnover. Thus, it appears that search serves many purposes.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1994

References

  • Further exploring the relationship between job search and voluntary turnover
    Blau, Blau
  • Do people make the place? An examination of the attraction‐selection‐attrition hypothesis
    Bretz, Bretz; Ash, Ash; Dreher, Dreher
  • A programmatic approach to studying the industrial environment and mental health
    French, French; Kahn, Kahn
  • The importance of recruitment in job choice: A different way of looking
    Rynes, Rynes; Bretz, Bretz; Gerhart, Gerhart

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