Job Satisfaction in Britain

Job Satisfaction in Britain Little recent empirical work in economics or industrial relations has examined job satisfaction, despite its demonstrated correlation with labour market behaviour such as quits, absenteeism and productivity. This paper uses information from a study of 5000 British employees to investigate the relationship between three measures of job satisfaction and a wide range of individual and job characteristics. Notably, men, workers in their thirties, the well‐educated, those working longer hours and workers in larger establishments have lower levels of job satisfaction. The estimated job satisfaction equations are used to calculate a measure of the shadow wage and to provide some evidence that is consistent with the existence of non‐compensating differentials in the industry and occupational wage structure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Industrial Relations Wiley

Job Satisfaction in Britain

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0007-1080
eISSN
1467-8543
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-8543.1996.tb00648.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Little recent empirical work in economics or industrial relations has examined job satisfaction, despite its demonstrated correlation with labour market behaviour such as quits, absenteeism and productivity. This paper uses information from a study of 5000 British employees to investigate the relationship between three measures of job satisfaction and a wide range of individual and job characteristics. Notably, men, workers in their thirties, the well‐educated, those working longer hours and workers in larger establishments have lower levels of job satisfaction. The estimated job satisfaction equations are used to calculate a measure of the shadow wage and to provide some evidence that is consistent with the existence of non‐compensating differentials in the industry and occupational wage structure.

Journal

British Journal of Industrial RelationsWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1996

References

  • Union influence on local union leaders’ perceptions of job insecurity: an empirical test
    Brown Johnson, N.; Bobko, P.; Hartenian, L. S.
  • The Perception of Poverty
    Hagenaars, A. J.

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