Job Interview Strategies For People with a Visible Disability

Job Interview Strategies For People with a Visible Disability A total of 117 students participated in the present investigation, which compared wheelchair‐user and able‐bodied job applicants as well as two interview‐taking strategies available to wheelchair users: disclosing the disability during the telephone screening or not doing so and acknowledging it only during a face‐to‐face interview. Results show that wheelchair‐user applicants were evaluated more favorably than able‐bodied applicants during the telephone interview, a finding consistent with the positivity bias and “sympathy effect” findings of others. After a face‐to‐face interview, wheelchair‐user applicants who did not disclose their disability over the telephone were evaluated somewhat more favorably than those who did so. However, they were less likely to be selected for the job. The implications of the results for theory, research, and practice are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Social Psychology Wiley

Job Interview Strategies For People with a Visible Disability

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-9029
eISSN
1559-1816
DOI
10.1111/j.1559-1816.1988.tb00033.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A total of 117 students participated in the present investigation, which compared wheelchair‐user and able‐bodied job applicants as well as two interview‐taking strategies available to wheelchair users: disclosing the disability during the telephone screening or not doing so and acknowledging it only during a face‐to‐face interview. Results show that wheelchair‐user applicants were evaluated more favorably than able‐bodied applicants during the telephone interview, a finding consistent with the positivity bias and “sympathy effect” findings of others. After a face‐to‐face interview, wheelchair‐user applicants who did not disclose their disability over the telephone were evaluated somewhat more favorably than those who did so. However, they were less likely to be selected for the job. The implications of the results for theory, research, and practice are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Applied Social PsychologyWiley

Published: May 1, 1988

References

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