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Job and industry fit: the effects of age and gender matches on career progress outcomes

Job and industry fit: the effects of age and gender matches on career progress outcomes Using a sample of 232 MBA alumni, we tested the impact of respondent age, gender, and their interaction on career progress outcomes (managerial level, number of promotions, and salary) and whether age‐ and gender‐type of contexts moderated these relationships. Women's salaries did not increase much with age, whereas men's salaries showed a marked increase with age. We also found a gender × job gender‐type effect on salary, such that women earned somewhat higher salaries in masculine‐typed jobs, while men earned considerably higher salaries in feminine‐typed jobs. In addition, we observed a three‐way interaction between gender, age, and age‐type of industry indicating that younger men received more promotions in old‐typed industries, while younger women received more promotions in young‐typed ones. Results are discussed in light of cognitive matching approaches and status characteristics theory. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Behavior Wiley

Job and industry fit: the effects of age and gender matches on career progress outcomes

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0894-3796
eISSN
1099-1379
DOI
10.1002/job.269
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using a sample of 232 MBA alumni, we tested the impact of respondent age, gender, and their interaction on career progress outcomes (managerial level, number of promotions, and salary) and whether age‐ and gender‐type of contexts moderated these relationships. Women's salaries did not increase much with age, whereas men's salaries showed a marked increase with age. We also found a gender × job gender‐type effect on salary, such that women earned somewhat higher salaries in masculine‐typed jobs, while men earned considerably higher salaries in feminine‐typed jobs. In addition, we observed a three‐way interaction between gender, age, and age‐type of industry indicating that younger men received more promotions in old‐typed industries, while younger women received more promotions in young‐typed ones. Results are discussed in light of cognitive matching approaches and status characteristics theory. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Journal of Organizational BehaviorWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2004

References

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