“It breaks your soul”: An in‐depth exploration of workplace injustice in nursing

“It breaks your soul”: An in‐depth exploration of workplace injustice in nursing BACKGROUNDSimilar to many health care roles, nursing often involves a combination of high demands and rewards. As reviewed by McVicar (), a large body of research literature explores these dynamics, and investigates how management and a range of workforce and organisational issues can be optimized for employee well‐being and effectiveness. This paper offers a new perspective, by examining these matters through the lens of organisational injustice. The term organisational injustice refers to perceived deficits in the qualities of fairness and equity as manifest in organisational interactions with and distribution of rewards to employees (Cho & Dansereau, ; Cropanzano, Bowen, & Gilliland, ; Kirkman, Chen, Farh, & Lowe, ). In contrast, the term organisational justice refers to evaluations of fairness and equity concerning the conduct of an organisation and, in particular, its management in respect to interactions with and distribution of rewards to employees (Cho & Dansereau, ; Cropanzano et al., ; Kirkman et al., ). Thus, the terms organisational injustice and organisational justice refer, respectively, to either deficits or sufficiency in fair treatment and fair procedures as directed to employees.In this paper, we specifically investigate how nurses’ everyday experiences of injustice impact on their well‐being. Our focus is on perceptions of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Nursing Management Wiley

“It breaks your soul”: An in‐depth exploration of workplace injustice in nursing

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0966-0429
eISSN
1365-2834
D.O.I.
10.1111/jonm.12535
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUNDSimilar to many health care roles, nursing often involves a combination of high demands and rewards. As reviewed by McVicar (), a large body of research literature explores these dynamics, and investigates how management and a range of workforce and organisational issues can be optimized for employee well‐being and effectiveness. This paper offers a new perspective, by examining these matters through the lens of organisational injustice. The term organisational injustice refers to perceived deficits in the qualities of fairness and equity as manifest in organisational interactions with and distribution of rewards to employees (Cho & Dansereau, ; Cropanzano, Bowen, & Gilliland, ; Kirkman, Chen, Farh, & Lowe, ). In contrast, the term organisational justice refers to evaluations of fairness and equity concerning the conduct of an organisation and, in particular, its management in respect to interactions with and distribution of rewards to employees (Cho & Dansereau, ; Cropanzano et al., ; Kirkman et al., ). Thus, the terms organisational injustice and organisational justice refer, respectively, to either deficits or sufficiency in fair treatment and fair procedures as directed to employees.In this paper, we specifically investigate how nurses’ everyday experiences of injustice impact on their well‐being. Our focus is on perceptions of

Journal

Journal of Nursing ManagementWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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