Isthmus sites identified by Ripple Mapping are usually anatomically stable: A novel method to guide atrial substrate ablation?

Isthmus sites identified by Ripple Mapping are usually anatomically stable: A novel method to... 1INTRODUCTIONElectrophysiologists commonly use bipolar voltage maps to highlight areas of low voltage that might be considered as scar or electrically inert tissue. It is frequently these areas that form the substrate for reentrant arrhythmias, and therefore they may be a target for ablation. In cases of ventricular tachycardia, there is consensus that substrate modification is appropriate even after successful ablation of the presenting tachycardia. However, in the atria it is unclear how to assess the arrhythmia substrate based upon electrogram recordings.The mechanism of atrial tachycardia (AT) is often iatrogenic in origin—either due to previous atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation or cardiac surgery. Bipolar voltage maps during tachycardia may help to identify isthmuses of conducting tissue bordered by scar that support activation. Whether the same scar distribution is seen with a change in activation vector or rate has not been studied in patients with AT following AF ablation. This is important, as if the isthmus locations remain concordant independent of the rhythm mapped, then this could guide substrate ablation outside of tachycardia for symptomatic patients noninducible on the day of their procedure or even at the time of their initial AF ablation procedure.Such an empirical ablation approach requires an accurate method http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology Wiley

Isthmus sites identified by Ripple Mapping are usually anatomically stable: A novel method to guide atrial substrate ablation?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/isthmus-sites-identified-by-ripple-mapping-are-usually-anatomically-TCXnCbW64U
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Journal compilation © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1045-3873
eISSN
1540-8167
D.O.I.
10.1111/jce.13425
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1INTRODUCTIONElectrophysiologists commonly use bipolar voltage maps to highlight areas of low voltage that might be considered as scar or electrically inert tissue. It is frequently these areas that form the substrate for reentrant arrhythmias, and therefore they may be a target for ablation. In cases of ventricular tachycardia, there is consensus that substrate modification is appropriate even after successful ablation of the presenting tachycardia. However, in the atria it is unclear how to assess the arrhythmia substrate based upon electrogram recordings.The mechanism of atrial tachycardia (AT) is often iatrogenic in origin—either due to previous atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation or cardiac surgery. Bipolar voltage maps during tachycardia may help to identify isthmuses of conducting tissue bordered by scar that support activation. Whether the same scar distribution is seen with a change in activation vector or rate has not been studied in patients with AT following AF ablation. This is important, as if the isthmus locations remain concordant independent of the rhythm mapped, then this could guide substrate ablation outside of tachycardia for symptomatic patients noninducible on the day of their procedure or even at the time of their initial AF ablation procedure.Such an empirical ablation approach requires an accurate method

Journal

Journal of Cardiovascular ElectrophysiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial