Invited reaction: Linking learning with financial performance

Invited reaction: Linking learning with financial performance This epigraph was recently related to us by the chief learning officer (CLO) of a major multinational firm. It is one familiar to many learning researchers and practitioners. Indeed, even a casual observer of research and practice regarding learning in organizations would have to concede that we have a “criterion” problem: however intuitive the value of learning and however strongly many organizations support learning, documenting relationships between learning strategies, interventions, and critical business performance outcomes has proven elusive. The feature article by Andrea Ellinger, Alexander Ellinger, Baiyin Yang, and Shelly Howton describes a research effort that is intriguing in large part because the authors so directly address that criterion problem. The authors took headon this question: Do learning organizations yield higher financial performance? Having collected survey data from a sample of practicing logistics managers, the authors conducted an impressive analysis of financial performance data of the sort we too rarely see in the HRD literature. They used an established research instrument for measuring learning organization dimensions. Most importantly, they have a compelling punch line: they found positive statistical relationships between managers’ perceptions of learning organization characteristics and firm financial performance. We suspect that most of the regular readers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Development Quarterly Wiley

Invited reaction: Linking learning with financial performance

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1044-8004
eISSN
1532-1096
DOI
10.1002/hrdq.1011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This epigraph was recently related to us by the chief learning officer (CLO) of a major multinational firm. It is one familiar to many learning researchers and practitioners. Indeed, even a casual observer of research and practice regarding learning in organizations would have to concede that we have a “criterion” problem: however intuitive the value of learning and however strongly many organizations support learning, documenting relationships between learning strategies, interventions, and critical business performance outcomes has proven elusive. The feature article by Andrea Ellinger, Alexander Ellinger, Baiyin Yang, and Shelly Howton describes a research effort that is intriguing in large part because the authors so directly address that criterion problem. The authors took headon this question: Do learning organizations yield higher financial performance? Having collected survey data from a sample of practicing logistics managers, the authors conducted an impressive analysis of financial performance data of the sort we too rarely see in the HRD literature. They used an established research instrument for measuring learning organization dimensions. Most importantly, they have a compelling punch line: they found positive statistical relationships between managers’ perceptions of learning organization characteristics and firm financial performance. We suspect that most of the regular readers

Journal

Human Resource Development QuarterlyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2002

References

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