Invited reaction: Development and initial validation of an instrument measuring managerial coaching skill

Invited reaction: Development and initial validation of an instrument measuring managerial... Literature Review As McLean et al. noted, there is no consensus on a clear definition or model of coaching and no agreement on the capabilities that coaches require. Confounding any review of the coaching literature is that many of the models are Note: We thank Susan Mecca, Dennis O’Brien, Marc Sokol, and Dianne Stober for their helpful comments on this article. HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, vol. 16, no. 2, Summer 2005 Copyright © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Peterson, Little designed for professional coaches rather than for managers. Whether the same models and principles are always applicable is not clear and is probably a topic worthy of investigation in itself. However, we see important differences between the two populations and the contexts in which they coach. For example, the professional coach typically has a single, relatively straightforward purpose for working with the person; the manager will have multiple agendas, and coaching may not even be the most important. Certainly the structure of the coaching will vary, since the manager is likely to have periodic and naturally occurring opportunities to observe and coach the person on the job, whereas the professional coach’s interactions will be scheduled for an hour or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Development Quarterly Wiley

Invited reaction: Development and initial validation of an instrument measuring managerial coaching skill

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1044-8004
eISSN
1532-1096
DOI
10.1002/hrdq.1132
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Literature Review As McLean et al. noted, there is no consensus on a clear definition or model of coaching and no agreement on the capabilities that coaches require. Confounding any review of the coaching literature is that many of the models are Note: We thank Susan Mecca, Dennis O’Brien, Marc Sokol, and Dianne Stober for their helpful comments on this article. HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, vol. 16, no. 2, Summer 2005 Copyright © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Peterson, Little designed for professional coaches rather than for managers. Whether the same models and principles are always applicable is not clear and is probably a topic worthy of investigation in itself. However, we see important differences between the two populations and the contexts in which they coach. For example, the professional coach typically has a single, relatively straightforward purpose for working with the person; the manager will have multiple agendas, and coaching may not even be the most important. Certainly the structure of the coaching will vary, since the manager is likely to have periodic and naturally occurring opportunities to observe and coach the person on the job, whereas the professional coach’s interactions will be scheduled for an hour or

Journal

Human Resource Development QuarterlyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2005

References

  • Manager coaching skills: What makes a good coach?
    Graham, Graham; Wedman, Wedman; Garvin‐Kester, Garvin‐Kester

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