Investigation on hydrates blockage and restart process mechanisms of CO2 hydrate slurry flow

Investigation on hydrates blockage and restart process mechanisms of CO2 hydrate slurry flow Being an alternative environment‐friendly fluid for the refrigeration process, CO2 hydrate slurry is undesired to result in hydrate blocking in the system. A series of water‐based CO2 hydrate slurry experiments were conducted to investigate hydrate blockages in a high‐pressure flow loop. Blocking would occur soon after CO2 hydrate formation onset. Rapid restart process after the first blocking was found to have serious consequence by inducing a fast hydrate regrowth and an irreversible secondary blocking. The mechanisms of the first blocking and the secondary blocking after the restart process were proposed, based on the observed phenomena and the particle chord length distribution data recorded by focused beam reflectance measurement probe. The influences of the initial flow rate on the supercooling, the induction time, the restart time, and the required time for the secondary blocking after the restart process were analyzed. The understanding on the blocking and restart process mechanisms of CO2 hydrate slurry is important not only in the development of hydrate‐based refrigeration system but also in the field of flow assurance in the oil and gas pipeline or for other applications such as the replacement of methane by CO2 in the naturally occurring hydrate exploration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia-Pacific Journal of Chemical Engineering Wiley

Investigation on hydrates blockage and restart process mechanisms of CO2 hydrate slurry flow

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Curtin University of Technology and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1932-2135
eISSN
1932-2143
D.O.I.
10.1002/apj.2193
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Being an alternative environment‐friendly fluid for the refrigeration process, CO2 hydrate slurry is undesired to result in hydrate blocking in the system. A series of water‐based CO2 hydrate slurry experiments were conducted to investigate hydrate blockages in a high‐pressure flow loop. Blocking would occur soon after CO2 hydrate formation onset. Rapid restart process after the first blocking was found to have serious consequence by inducing a fast hydrate regrowth and an irreversible secondary blocking. The mechanisms of the first blocking and the secondary blocking after the restart process were proposed, based on the observed phenomena and the particle chord length distribution data recorded by focused beam reflectance measurement probe. The influences of the initial flow rate on the supercooling, the induction time, the restart time, and the required time for the secondary blocking after the restart process were analyzed. The understanding on the blocking and restart process mechanisms of CO2 hydrate slurry is important not only in the development of hydrate‐based refrigeration system but also in the field of flow assurance in the oil and gas pipeline or for other applications such as the replacement of methane by CO2 in the naturally occurring hydrate exploration.

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Chemical EngineeringWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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