Investigation of accommodative and binocular function in dyslexia

Investigation of accommodative and binocular function in dyslexia The visual correlates of dyslexia are the subject of controversy, and much evidence suggests that they may include some aspects of binocular and accommodative function. These factors were investigated in 43 control and 39 dyslexic children, who were matched for age, sex and performance intelligence quotient. The dyslexic group exhibited significantly lower positive and negative vergence reserves, and vergence instability when the eyes were dissociated at near. Their amplitudes of accommodation also were significantly reduced. However, other measures including dissociated and associated heterophoria and accommodative lag and facility were similar in both groups. The stability of motor ocular dominance, as assessed with a modified Dunlop test, was similar in both groups. The results of a simulated reading visual search task suggested that the vergence and accommodative dysfunction were not a major cause of the dyslexia. Further analyses, using reading‐age matched groups, suggested that these ocular motor correlates were not attributable to the better reading performance in the control group. The most likely remaining explanation is that they are, in most cases, non‐causal correlates of the dyslexia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics Wiley

Investigation of accommodative and binocular function in dyslexia

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0275-5408
eISSN
1475-1313
DOI
10.1111/j.1475-1313.1994.tb00550.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The visual correlates of dyslexia are the subject of controversy, and much evidence suggests that they may include some aspects of binocular and accommodative function. These factors were investigated in 43 control and 39 dyslexic children, who were matched for age, sex and performance intelligence quotient. The dyslexic group exhibited significantly lower positive and negative vergence reserves, and vergence instability when the eyes were dissociated at near. Their amplitudes of accommodation also were significantly reduced. However, other measures including dissociated and associated heterophoria and accommodative lag and facility were similar in both groups. The stability of motor ocular dominance, as assessed with a modified Dunlop test, was similar in both groups. The results of a simulated reading visual search task suggested that the vergence and accommodative dysfunction were not a major cause of the dyslexia. Further analyses, using reading‐age matched groups, suggested that these ocular motor correlates were not attributable to the better reading performance in the control group. The most likely remaining explanation is that they are, in most cases, non‐causal correlates of the dyslexia.

Journal

Ophthalmic and Physiological OpticsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1994

References

  • The early diagnosis of developmental dyslexia
    Singleton, Singleton
  • The concept of specific reading retardation
    Rutter, Rutter; Yule, Yule
  • Review of ophthalmic factors in dyslexia
    Evans, Evans; Drasdo, Drasdo
  • An investigation of the optometric correlates of reading disability
    Evans, Evans; Drasdo, Drasdo; Richards, Richards
  • Estimating WAIS IQ from progressive matrices scores
    Shaw, Shaw
  • Review article: current thoughts on migraine
    Diamond, Diamond; Medina, Medina
  • Anthropometry for children's spectacle frames
    Kaye, Kaye; Obstfeld, Obstfeld
  • Criteria for decompensation in binocular vision
    Jenkins, Jenkins; Pickwell, Pickwell; Yekta, Yekta
  • What children see affects how they read
    Cornelissen, Cornelissen; Bradley, Bradley; Fowler, Fowler; Stein, Stein
  • Tinted lenses and related therapies for learning disabilities: a review
    Evans, Evans; Drasdo, Drasdo

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