Investigating the Linear Dependence of Direct and Indirect Radiative Forcing on Emission of Carbonaceous Aerosols in a Global Climate Model

Investigating the Linear Dependence of Direct and Indirect Radiative Forcing on Emission of... The relationship between forcing and emission is investigated for black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) emitted from North America and Asia. Direct and indirect radiative forcing (DRF and IRF) of BC and OC are simulated with CAM5.1. Two diagnostics are introduced to aid policy‐relevant discussions: linearity and emission‐normalized forcing. DRF is linearly related to emission for both BC and OC from two regions, and the linear relationship is similar, within 15%. IRF is linear in emissions when emissions are lower and regions are far from sources (North American BC and OC). Indirect radiative forcing is sublinear for strong sources and near‐source regions (Asian OC). Emission‐normalized IRF in North America is two to four times higher than that in Asia. The difference among regions and species is primarily caused by particle density as high density of BC results in fewer emitted particles and by the processes for accumulation mode particles to become cloud condensation nuclei and then to activate into cloud droplet. Lower emission‐normalized IRF in more polluted regions means that reductions of OC in these regions would be relatively climate‐neutral rather than causing significant warming via IRF reduction. An optimal aggregation area (30° × 30°) is identified for analysis of the forcing‐to‐emission relationship. For IRF, only 15–40% of the Earth's surface is significantly affected by an emission region, but forcing in these regions comprises most of the global impact. Emission‐normalized forcing can be used to estimate forcing changes due to emission reductions, as long as causes of nonlinearity are identified and considered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Wiley

Investigating the Linear Dependence of Direct and Indirect Radiative Forcing on Emission of Carbonaceous Aerosols in a Global Climate Model

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/investigating-the-linear-dependence-of-direct-and-indirect-radiative-D1DiwsRb20
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
©2018. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2169-897X
eISSN
2169-8996
D.O.I.
10.1002/2017JD027244
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship between forcing and emission is investigated for black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) emitted from North America and Asia. Direct and indirect radiative forcing (DRF and IRF) of BC and OC are simulated with CAM5.1. Two diagnostics are introduced to aid policy‐relevant discussions: linearity and emission‐normalized forcing. DRF is linearly related to emission for both BC and OC from two regions, and the linear relationship is similar, within 15%. IRF is linear in emissions when emissions are lower and regions are far from sources (North American BC and OC). Indirect radiative forcing is sublinear for strong sources and near‐source regions (Asian OC). Emission‐normalized IRF in North America is two to four times higher than that in Asia. The difference among regions and species is primarily caused by particle density as high density of BC results in fewer emitted particles and by the processes for accumulation mode particles to become cloud condensation nuclei and then to activate into cloud droplet. Lower emission‐normalized IRF in more polluted regions means that reductions of OC in these regions would be relatively climate‐neutral rather than causing significant warming via IRF reduction. An optimal aggregation area (30° × 30°) is identified for analysis of the forcing‐to‐emission relationship. For IRF, only 15–40% of the Earth's surface is significantly affected by an emission region, but forcing in these regions comprises most of the global impact. Emission‐normalized forcing can be used to estimate forcing changes due to emission reductions, as long as causes of nonlinearity are identified and considered.

Journal

Journal of Geophysical Research: AtmospheresWiley

Published: Jan 16, 2018

Keywords: ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off