Introgressive hybridization in fishes: the biochemical evidence

Introgressive hybridization in fishes: the biochemical evidence Biochemical methods can detect variation at individual genetic loci, making possible the direct assessment of natural hybridization and introgression between fish populations. Protein electro‐phoresis has been used to confirm and extend knowledge of many situations where species hybrids have been detected by morphological analyses. New cases of natural hybridization, including some at the subspecies level, have also been identified. Biochemical studies have provided the first conclusive evidence of natural post F1 hybrids and of introgression between fish taxa. The strongest cases for introgression have used a combined analysis of nuclear protein genes and taxaspecific maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA variation. Information on the significance of introgression as a source of gene flow between taxa, particularly below the species level where sympatric subspecies and sibling species are involved, should expand in the future as the numbers and types of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA loci which can be assayed for variation increase. The full importance of introgressive hybridization in speciation may then be understood. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

Introgressive hybridization in fishes: the biochemical evidence

Journal of Fish Biology, Volume 39 – Dec 1, 1991

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1095-8649.1991.tb05094.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biochemical methods can detect variation at individual genetic loci, making possible the direct assessment of natural hybridization and introgression between fish populations. Protein electro‐phoresis has been used to confirm and extend knowledge of many situations where species hybrids have been detected by morphological analyses. New cases of natural hybridization, including some at the subspecies level, have also been identified. Biochemical studies have provided the first conclusive evidence of natural post F1 hybrids and of introgression between fish taxa. The strongest cases for introgression have used a combined analysis of nuclear protein genes and taxaspecific maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA variation. Information on the significance of introgression as a source of gene flow between taxa, particularly below the species level where sympatric subspecies and sibling species are involved, should expand in the future as the numbers and types of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA loci which can be assayed for variation increase. The full importance of introgressive hybridization in speciation may then be understood.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1991

References

  • Protein loci in the Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus L.: electrophoretic expression and genetic variability patterns
    Anderson, Anderson; Ryman, Ryman; Ståhl, Ståhl
  • Hybridization and introgression among species of sunfish ( Lepomis ): analysis by mitochondrial DNA and allozyme markers
    Avise, Avise; Saunders, Saunders
  • Observations on morphological and biochemical features of some cyprinid hybrids
    Child, Child; Solomon, Solomon
  • Amount and distribution of biochemical‐genetic variation among wild populations and a hatchery stock of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., from north‐east Ireland
    Crozier, Crozier; Moffett, Moffett
  • Biochemical evidence of hybrid gene introgression in some reservoir populations of Tilapia in southern Sri Lanka
    Silva, Silva; Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe
  • Allozyme evidence for reproductively isolated sympatric populations of brown trout, Salmo trutta L., in Lough Melvin, Ireland
    Ferguson, Ferguson; Mason, Mason
  • Incongruent estimates of population differentiation among brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis , from Cape Race, Newfoundland, Canada, based upon allozyme and mitochondrial DNA variation
    Ferguson, Ferguson; Danzmann, Danzmann; Hutchings, Hutchings
  • Natural hybridization between Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar , and brown trout, Salmo trutta , in northern Spain
    Leaniz, Leaniz; Verspoor, Verspoor
  • Introgression between two cutthroat trout subspecies with substantial karyotypic, nuclear and mitochondrial genomic divergence
    Gyllensten, Gyllensten; Leary, Leary; Allendorf, Allendorf; Wilson, Wilson
  • High frequency of natural hybrids between Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar L.) and brown trout ( S. trutta ) in a Swedish river
    Jansson, Jansson; Holmgren, Holmgren; Wedin, Wedin; Andersson, Andersson
  • An analysis of five enzyme‐gene loci in four etheostomid species (Percidae: Pices) in an area of possible introgression
    Martin, Martin; Richmond, Richmond
  • Protein variation in wild Atlantic salmon, with particular reference to southern Ireland
    McElligott, McElligott; Cross, Cross
  • Conservation genetics in the management of desert fishes
    Meffe, Meffe; Vriejenhoek, Vriejenhoek
  • Spontaneous hybridization in Cottidae
    Nyman, Nyman; Westin, Westin
  • The existence of natural hybrids between the European trout and the Atlantic salmon
    Payne, Payne; Child, Child; Forrest, Forrest
  • Multivariate analysis of genetic exchanges between Solea aegyptiaca and Solea senegalensis (Teleosts, Soleidae)
    She, She; Autem, Autem; Kotulas, Kotulas; Pasteur, Pasteur; Bonhomme, Bonhomme
  • Hypervariable minisatellite DNA single locus probes for the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L
    Taggart, Taggart; Ferguson, Ferguson
  • Widespread hybridization between native Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar , and introduced brown trout, S. trutta , in eastern Newfoundland
    Verspoor, Verspoor
  • Genetic variation at the Me‐2 locus in the Atlantic salmon within and between rivers: evidence for its selective maintenance
    Verspoor, Verspoor; Jordan, Jordan

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