Introductions of distinct stocks of chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum), into natural populations of the species

Introductions of distinct stocks of chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum), into natural... Populations of chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta, are recognizable by the allelic frequencies of allozyme loci. Identification of these was used to assess the return of spawning adults to alien rivers into which they were introduced via hatchery‐reared, artificially‐fertilized eggs obtained from populations elsewhere in the Soviet Far East. Coefficients of return to spawn in the alien rivers were much lower than returns for the native fish, and in succeeding generations the alien fish disappeared from the spawning runs. It is concluded that transplanting salmonid eggs between populations is ineffective as a means of establishing new stock in territory already occupied by another stock, and the practice is deplored on grounds of conserving unique gene pools within species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

Introductions of distinct stocks of chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum), into natural populations of the species

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1095-8649.1990.tb05017.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Populations of chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta, are recognizable by the allelic frequencies of allozyme loci. Identification of these was used to assess the return of spawning adults to alien rivers into which they were introduced via hatchery‐reared, artificially‐fertilized eggs obtained from populations elsewhere in the Soviet Far East. Coefficients of return to spawn in the alien rivers were much lower than returns for the native fish, and in succeeding generations the alien fish disappeared from the spawning runs. It is concluded that transplanting salmonid eggs between populations is ineffective as a means of establishing new stock in territory already occupied by another stock, and the practice is deplored on grounds of conserving unique gene pools within species.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1990

References

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