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Introduction to Special Issue on Terrorism and Its Consequences

Introduction to Special Issue on Terrorism and Its Consequences Brandeis University After the jets hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, we were hypnotized by the television images and devastated by the immense destruction and the great loss of lives. Many of us questioned whether our usual activities were worth doing and wished that we could help. This special issue of Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy was conceived as a way to be helpful to faculty teaching during these difficult times, to their students, and to other readers by offering them some of the ideas and research of psychologists who have expertise in areas related to terrorism and its consequences. The articles in this issue have come together as a result of both choice and chance. Two weeks after September 11 (after discussion with SPSSI leaders and the ASAP editorial board), I issued a call for relevant papers that was posted on several list-servs and passed on to others. There were many responses. After a great deal of e-mail correspondence, peer reviews, and revisions (all done at blazing speed compared to the usual pace of academic publishing), we have brought together a set of 15 articles on a broad range of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy Wiley

Introduction to Special Issue on Terrorism and Its Consequences

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
ISSN
1529-7489
eISSN
1530-2415
DOI
10.1111/j.1530-2415.2002.00019.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brandeis University After the jets hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, we were hypnotized by the television images and devastated by the immense destruction and the great loss of lives. Many of us questioned whether our usual activities were worth doing and wished that we could help. This special issue of Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy was conceived as a way to be helpful to faculty teaching during these difficult times, to their students, and to other readers by offering them some of the ideas and research of psychologists who have expertise in areas related to terrorism and its consequences. The articles in this issue have come together as a result of both choice and chance. Two weeks after September 11 (after discussion with SPSSI leaders and the ASAP editorial board), I issued a call for relevant papers that was posted on several list-servs and passed on to others. There were many responses. After a great deal of e-mail correspondence, peer reviews, and revisions (all done at blazing speed compared to the usual pace of academic publishing), we have brought together a set of 15 articles on a broad range of

Journal

Analyses of Social Issues & Public PolicyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2002

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