Intestinal permeability is increased in burn patients shortly after injury

Intestinal permeability is increased in burn patients shortly after injury There is increasing direct experimental and indirect clinical evidence to indicate that under certain conditions intestinal barrier function may be lost in trauma victims. No direct measurements, however, have been performed in patients to determine whether intestinal permeability is increased shortly after a major thermal injury in the absence of infection. Fifteen hemodynamically stable burn patients with burns on more than 20% of their body surface (39% ± 12%) had their intestinal permeability measured within 24 hours of injury with use of the two nonmetabolizable sugars lactulose and manmtol as permeability markers. Lactulose absorption was fourfold higher in the patients (223 ± 54 μmol) than in the controls (58 ± 77 μmole;p < 0.02), whereas the lactulose/manmtol ratio was threefold higher (5.2 vs 1.7; p < 0.05). Thus intestinal permeability was increased in patients with moderate to major burn injuries shortly after injury. (SURGERY 1990;107:411‐6). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Surgery Wiley

Intestinal permeability is increased in burn patients shortly after injury

British Journal of Surgery, Volume 77 (5) – May 1, 1990

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.
ISSN
0007-1323
eISSN
1365-2168
DOI
10.1002/bjs.1800770541
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is increasing direct experimental and indirect clinical evidence to indicate that under certain conditions intestinal barrier function may be lost in trauma victims. No direct measurements, however, have been performed in patients to determine whether intestinal permeability is increased shortly after a major thermal injury in the absence of infection. Fifteen hemodynamically stable burn patients with burns on more than 20% of their body surface (39% ± 12%) had their intestinal permeability measured within 24 hours of injury with use of the two nonmetabolizable sugars lactulose and manmtol as permeability markers. Lactulose absorption was fourfold higher in the patients (223 ± 54 μmol) than in the controls (58 ± 77 μmole;p < 0.02), whereas the lactulose/manmtol ratio was threefold higher (5.2 vs 1.7; p < 0.05). Thus intestinal permeability was increased in patients with moderate to major burn injuries shortly after injury. (SURGERY 1990;107:411‐6).

Journal

British Journal of SurgeryWiley

Published: May 1, 1990

References

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