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Interviewing strategies with young people: the ‘secret box’, stimulus material and task‐based activities

Interviewing strategies with young people: the ‘secret box’, stimulus material and task‐based... This paper reflects on the use of a range of interviewing strategies carried out with 13–14 year olds for a research project about young people's problems and coping strategies. The advantages and disadvantages of using both group and individual interviews with various task‐based activities (grouping and ranking exercises, spider diagrams and charts) and stimulus material (problem pages, video clips and common phrases) are examined. The development and use of an innovative technique, the ‘secret box’, is also discussed. The mix of techniques alongside straightforward questioning was designed to offer variety to engage young people's interest, to account for their different preferences, to stimulate discussion about a potentially sensitive topic and to help to lessen the unequal power relationship between the adult researcher and the young participant. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Children & Society Wiley

Interviewing strategies with young people: the ‘secret box’, stimulus material and task‐based activities

Children & Society , Volume 16 (1) – Jan 1, 2002

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References (10)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0951-0605
eISSN
1099-0860
DOI
10.1002/chi.685
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper reflects on the use of a range of interviewing strategies carried out with 13–14 year olds for a research project about young people's problems and coping strategies. The advantages and disadvantages of using both group and individual interviews with various task‐based activities (grouping and ranking exercises, spider diagrams and charts) and stimulus material (problem pages, video clips and common phrases) are examined. The development and use of an innovative technique, the ‘secret box’, is also discussed. The mix of techniques alongside straightforward questioning was designed to offer variety to engage young people's interest, to account for their different preferences, to stimulate discussion about a potentially sensitive topic and to help to lessen the unequal power relationship between the adult researcher and the young participant. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Children & SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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