Interviewer's Moods and Reactions to Job Applicants: The Influence of Affective States on Applied Social Judgments

Interviewer's Moods and Reactions to Job Applicants: The Influence of Affective States on Applied... Male and female subjects interviewed a same‐sex applicant for an entry‐level management position. In reality, this person was an accomplice who presented a carefully standardized pattern of positive and negative information. Prior to the interview, participants were exposed to treatments designed to place them in a positive, neutral, or negative mood. Results indicated that subjects’ moods influenced their reactions to the applicant. They rated this individual higher on job‐related and personal dimensions and made more favorable employment decisions about him or her when in a positive than negative mood. In addition, participants recalled more information presented by the applicant that was consistent with their current mood than information that was inconsistent with these feelings. Implications of these findings for the development of closer conceptual links between (a) basic knowledge about social cognition and (b) practical issues relating to the conduction of fair employment interviews are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Social Psychology Wiley

Interviewer's Moods and Reactions to Job Applicants: The Influence of Affective States on Applied Social Judgments

Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Volume 17 (10) – Oct 1, 1987

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-9029
eISSN
1559-1816
DOI
10.1111/j.1559-1816.1987.tb00298.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Male and female subjects interviewed a same‐sex applicant for an entry‐level management position. In reality, this person was an accomplice who presented a carefully standardized pattern of positive and negative information. Prior to the interview, participants were exposed to treatments designed to place them in a positive, neutral, or negative mood. Results indicated that subjects’ moods influenced their reactions to the applicant. They rated this individual higher on job‐related and personal dimensions and made more favorable employment decisions about him or her when in a positive than negative mood. In addition, participants recalled more information presented by the applicant that was consistent with their current mood than information that was inconsistent with these feelings. Implications of these findings for the development of closer conceptual links between (a) basic knowledge about social cognition and (b) practical issues relating to the conduction of fair employment interviews are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Applied Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1987

References

  • The influence of positive affect on decision‐making strategy
    Isen, Isen; Means, Means

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