Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs

Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs Key PointsSerum levels of topiramate, rufinamide, and N‐desmethylclobazam increased in children and adults with increasing CBD doseSerum levels of zonisamide and eslicarbazepine increased in adults with increasing CBD doseAdult participants reported sedation more frequently with higher N‐desmethylclobazam levelsAST and ALT levels were higher in participants taking concomitant valproate with CBDFor millennia, there has been great interest in the use of cannabis and its derivatives in the treatment of various medical and neurologic problems, including epilepsy. Cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid compound derived from the cannabis plant, is of particular interest as a potential anticonvulsant due to the reported lack of psychoactive effects compared to those seen in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD has long been known to be effective in animal models of epilepsy. However, until recently, few data were available regarding its safety and efficacy in humans. Recent placebo‐controlled studies indicate that CBD may be effective for the treatment of difficult‐to‐control epilepsies including Dravet and Lennox‐Gastaut syndromes. These experimental data are supported by observational data from class IV open‐label compassionate‐use CBD state‐sponsored expanded‐access programs, such as the one in Alabama recognized under the name “Carly's Law.”CBD modulates several cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, which are of potential interest in investigating interactions with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Epilepsia Wiley

Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/interactions-between-cannabidiol-and-commonly-used-antiepileptic-drugs-7lxZNTbuO0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy
ISSN
0013-9580
eISSN
1528-1167
DOI
10.1111/epi.13852
pmid
28782097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsSerum levels of topiramate, rufinamide, and N‐desmethylclobazam increased in children and adults with increasing CBD doseSerum levels of zonisamide and eslicarbazepine increased in adults with increasing CBD doseAdult participants reported sedation more frequently with higher N‐desmethylclobazam levelsAST and ALT levels were higher in participants taking concomitant valproate with CBDFor millennia, there has been great interest in the use of cannabis and its derivatives in the treatment of various medical and neurologic problems, including epilepsy. Cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid compound derived from the cannabis plant, is of particular interest as a potential anticonvulsant due to the reported lack of psychoactive effects compared to those seen in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD has long been known to be effective in animal models of epilepsy. However, until recently, few data were available regarding its safety and efficacy in humans. Recent placebo‐controlled studies indicate that CBD may be effective for the treatment of difficult‐to‐control epilepsies including Dravet and Lennox‐Gastaut syndromes. These experimental data are supported by observational data from class IV open‐label compassionate‐use CBD state‐sponsored expanded‐access programs, such as the one in Alabama recognized under the name “Carly's Law.”CBD modulates several cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, which are of potential interest in investigating interactions with

Journal

EpilepsiaWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2017

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References