Integrating species and habitat data for nature conservation in Great Britain: data sources and methods

Integrating species and habitat data for nature conservation in Great Britain: data sources and... Summary 1.Britain is unusual in the quantity and quality of species and habitat data available, at both national and regional scales. This paper reviews the sources, coverage and quality of these data. 2.Habitat and species data are used by conservation agencies in England, Scotland and Wales for site selection and for monitoring habitat quality. The paper argues, however, that neither habitat data nor species distribution data on their own are sufficient to locate and monitor habitats for nature conservation purposes effectively. 3.Differences in sampling methodologies between habitat and species surveys present methodological difficulties for the development of an integrated monitoring system that uses both types of data. These problems need to be overcome if habitat and species data are to be used more effectively for nature conservation in the wider countryside. 4.A more integrated system based on the concept of biotope occupancy is proposed and discussed. The implementation of the system would assist with understanding those factors that explain observed patterns in species distribution and diversity, thereby helping to improve the effectiveness of policies for nature conservation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Ecology Wiley

Integrating species and habitat data for nature conservation in Great Britain: data sources and methods

Global Ecology, Volume 8 (5) – Sep 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1466-822X
eISSN
1466-8238
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2699.1999.00143.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary 1.Britain is unusual in the quantity and quality of species and habitat data available, at both national and regional scales. This paper reviews the sources, coverage and quality of these data. 2.Habitat and species data are used by conservation agencies in England, Scotland and Wales for site selection and for monitoring habitat quality. The paper argues, however, that neither habitat data nor species distribution data on their own are sufficient to locate and monitor habitats for nature conservation purposes effectively. 3.Differences in sampling methodologies between habitat and species surveys present methodological difficulties for the development of an integrated monitoring system that uses both types of data. These problems need to be overcome if habitat and species data are to be used more effectively for nature conservation in the wider countryside. 4.A more integrated system based on the concept of biotope occupancy is proposed and discussed. The implementation of the system would assist with understanding those factors that explain observed patterns in species distribution and diversity, thereby helping to improve the effectiveness of policies for nature conservation.

Journal

Global EcologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1999

References

  • Conservation of fragmented populations
    Fahrig, Fahrig; Merriam, Merriam
  • Population declines and range contractions among lowland farmland birds in Britain
    Fuller, Fuller; Gregory, Gregory; Gibbons, Gibbons; Marchant, Marchant; Wilson, Wilson; Baillie, Baillie; Carter, Carter
  • The global magnitude of insect species richness
    Gaston, Gaston
  • Influences of population size and woodland area on bird species distributions in small woods
    Hinsley, Hinsley
  • Biological consequences of ecosystem fragmentation: a review
    Saunders, Saunders; Hobbs, Hobbs; Margules, Margules
  • Estimating rates of butterfly decline from distribution maps: the effect of scale
    Thomas, Thomas; Abery, Abery
  • Landscape ecology: The effect of pattern on process
    Turner, Turner
  • The use of phytosociological data in conservation assessment: a case study of lowland grasslands in mid Wales
    Yeo, Yeo; Blackstock, Blackstock; Stevens, Stevens

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