Intakes and sources of total and added sugars among 4 to 13‐year‐old children in China, Mexico and the United States

Intakes and sources of total and added sugars among 4 to 13‐year‐old children in China,... IntroductionCulture and geography shape availability of foods, traditions, attitudes and preferences towards foods , which partly explain differences in nutrient intakes and the sources of nutrients across geographies. In the case of dietary sugars, several national and international recommendations on intakes of dietary sugars have been recently issued. There is a general global consensus that excess dietary sugar intakes may lead to excess weight gain and play a role in the development of non‐communicable diseases and should, therefore, be decreased . However, definitions and targets for recommendations differ broadly between organizations at both the national and international levels . While the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends to decrease free sugars to less than 10% total energy intake (TEI) with a preference to go as low as 5%, other recommendations range from 4.4% to 10% TEI with an upper limit of 25% TEI . Finally, some countries are advocating for a general reduction of sources of total and added sugars, without providing a specific threshold .Comparing intakes of nutrients such as dietary sugars across geographies may allow us to learn more about drivers of non‐communicable diseases at a national and international level, and also about the complexities that arise due http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Obesity Wiley

Intakes and sources of total and added sugars among 4 to 13‐year‐old children in China, Mexico and the United States

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 World Obesity Federation
ISSN
2047-6302
eISSN
2047-6310
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijpo.12234
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionCulture and geography shape availability of foods, traditions, attitudes and preferences towards foods , which partly explain differences in nutrient intakes and the sources of nutrients across geographies. In the case of dietary sugars, several national and international recommendations on intakes of dietary sugars have been recently issued. There is a general global consensus that excess dietary sugar intakes may lead to excess weight gain and play a role in the development of non‐communicable diseases and should, therefore, be decreased . However, definitions and targets for recommendations differ broadly between organizations at both the national and international levels . While the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends to decrease free sugars to less than 10% total energy intake (TEI) with a preference to go as low as 5%, other recommendations range from 4.4% to 10% TEI with an upper limit of 25% TEI . Finally, some countries are advocating for a general reduction of sources of total and added sugars, without providing a specific threshold .Comparing intakes of nutrients such as dietary sugars across geographies may allow us to learn more about drivers of non‐communicable diseases at a national and international level, and also about the complexities that arise due

Journal

Pediatric ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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