Inhibition of IRE1 results in decreased scar formation

Inhibition of IRE1 results in decreased scar formation Wound healing is characterized by the production of large amounts of protein necessary to replace lost cellular mass and extracellular matrix. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important adaptive cellular response to increased protein synthesis. One of the main components of the UPR is IRE1, an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein with endonuclease activity that produces the activated form of the transcription factor XBP1. Using luciferase reporter mice for Xbp1 splicing, we showed that IRE1 was up‐regulated during excisional wound healing at the time in wound healing consistent with that of the proliferative phase, when the majority of protein synthesis for cellular proliferation and matrix deposition occurs. Furthermore, using a small molecule inhibitor of IRE1 we demonstrated that inhibition of IRE1 led to decreased scar formation in treated mice. Results were recapitulated in a hypertrophic scar mouse model. These data help provide a cellular pathway to target in the treatment of hypertrophic scarring and keloid disorders. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wound Repair and Regeneration Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2017 by the Wound Healing Society
ISSN
1067-1927
eISSN
1524-475X
D.O.I.
10.1111/wrr.12603
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wound healing is characterized by the production of large amounts of protein necessary to replace lost cellular mass and extracellular matrix. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important adaptive cellular response to increased protein synthesis. One of the main components of the UPR is IRE1, an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein with endonuclease activity that produces the activated form of the transcription factor XBP1. Using luciferase reporter mice for Xbp1 splicing, we showed that IRE1 was up‐regulated during excisional wound healing at the time in wound healing consistent with that of the proliferative phase, when the majority of protein synthesis for cellular proliferation and matrix deposition occurs. Furthermore, using a small molecule inhibitor of IRE1 we demonstrated that inhibition of IRE1 led to decreased scar formation in treated mice. Results were recapitulated in a hypertrophic scar mouse model. These data help provide a cellular pathway to target in the treatment of hypertrophic scarring and keloid disorders.

Journal

Wound Repair and RegenerationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2017

References

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