Influence of Prehospital Function and Strength on Outcomes of Critically Ill Older Adults

Influence of Prehospital Function and Strength on Outcomes of Critically Ill Older Adults Older persons are more likely than younger adults to develop and die from critical illnesses requiring intensive care services, such as severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sepsis. The sources of these age‐related disparities in death across seemingly different disease states are incompletely understood.One factor that may contribute to poor outcomes in older adults experiencing an acute illness is their prehospitalization functional status. Previous studies have shown that physical function is a major determinant of hospital admissions, length of stay (LOS), and mortality in older adults with wide‐ranging medical conditions. Although these findings support the concept that physical function is an important variable predicting mortality and morbidity across differing domains, the effect of prehospital physical function on individuals subsequently experiencing a critical illness has been understudied. The relevance of preillness physical function to traditional critical care outcomes, such as mortality, is important to understand because critical care severity‐of‐illness scoring systems do not account for baseline physical function. The lack of longitudinal databases in the critical care field limits the ability to explore this question adequately.A better understanding of the effect of baseline physical function on the outcomes of individuals with critical illness has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 American Geriatrics Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
D.O.I.
10.1111/jgs.15255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Older persons are more likely than younger adults to develop and die from critical illnesses requiring intensive care services, such as severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sepsis. The sources of these age‐related disparities in death across seemingly different disease states are incompletely understood.One factor that may contribute to poor outcomes in older adults experiencing an acute illness is their prehospitalization functional status. Previous studies have shown that physical function is a major determinant of hospital admissions, length of stay (LOS), and mortality in older adults with wide‐ranging medical conditions. Although these findings support the concept that physical function is an important variable predicting mortality and morbidity across differing domains, the effect of prehospital physical function on individuals subsequently experiencing a critical illness has been understudied. The relevance of preillness physical function to traditional critical care outcomes, such as mortality, is important to understand because critical care severity‐of‐illness scoring systems do not account for baseline physical function. The lack of longitudinal databases in the critical care field limits the ability to explore this question adequately.A better understanding of the effect of baseline physical function on the outcomes of individuals with critical illness has

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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