Influence of fire and soil nutrients on native and non‐native annuals at remnant vegetation edges in the Western Australian wheatbelt

Influence of fire and soil nutrients on native and non‐native annuals at remnant vegetation... Abstract. The effect of fire on annual plants was examined in two vegetation types at remnant vegetation edges in the Western Australian wheatbelt. Density and cover of non‐native species were consistently greatest at the reserve edges, decreasing rapidly with increasing distance from reserve edge. Numbers of native species showed little effect of distance from reserve edge. Fire had no apparent effect on abundance of non‐natives in Allocasuarina shrubland but abundance of native plants increased. Density of both non‐native and native plants in Acacia acuminata‐Eucalyptus loxophleba woodland decreased after fire. Fewer non‐native species were found in the shrubland than in the woodland in both unburnt and burnt areas, this difference being smallest between burnt areas. Levels of soil phosphorus and nitrate were higher in burnt areas of both communities and ammonium also increased in the shrubland. Levels of soil phosphorus and nitrate were higher at the reserve edge in the unburnt shrubland, but not in the woodland. There was a strong correlation between soil phosphorus levels and abundance of non‐native species in the unburnt shrubland, but not after fire or in the woodland. Removal of non‐native plants in the burnt shrubland had a strong positive effect on total abundance of native plants, apparently due to increases in growth of smaller, suppressed native plants in response to decreased competition. Two native species showed increased seed production in plots where non‐native plants had been removed. There was a general indication that, in the short term, fire does not necessarily increase invasion of these communities by non‐native species and could, therefore be a useful management tool in remnant vegetation, providing other disturbances are minimised. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Influence of fire and soil nutrients on native and non‐native annuals at remnant vegetation edges in the Western Australian wheatbelt

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/influence-of-fire-and-soil-nutrients-on-native-and-non-native-annuals-MfBkgb3NzX
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1992 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3236003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. The effect of fire on annual plants was examined in two vegetation types at remnant vegetation edges in the Western Australian wheatbelt. Density and cover of non‐native species were consistently greatest at the reserve edges, decreasing rapidly with increasing distance from reserve edge. Numbers of native species showed little effect of distance from reserve edge. Fire had no apparent effect on abundance of non‐natives in Allocasuarina shrubland but abundance of native plants increased. Density of both non‐native and native plants in Acacia acuminata‐Eucalyptus loxophleba woodland decreased after fire. Fewer non‐native species were found in the shrubland than in the woodland in both unburnt and burnt areas, this difference being smallest between burnt areas. Levels of soil phosphorus and nitrate were higher in burnt areas of both communities and ammonium also increased in the shrubland. Levels of soil phosphorus and nitrate were higher at the reserve edge in the unburnt shrubland, but not in the woodland. There was a strong correlation between soil phosphorus levels and abundance of non‐native species in the unburnt shrubland, but not after fire or in the woodland. Removal of non‐native plants in the burnt shrubland had a strong positive effect on total abundance of native plants, apparently due to increases in growth of smaller, suppressed native plants in response to decreased competition. Two native species showed increased seed production in plots where non‐native plants had been removed. There was a general indication that, in the short term, fire does not necessarily increase invasion of these communities by non‐native species and could, therefore be a useful management tool in remnant vegetation, providing other disturbances are minimised.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1992

References

  • Biological consequences of ecosystem fragmentation: a review
    Saunders, Saunders; Hobbs, Hobbs; Margules, Margules

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off