Inflammatory Responses Underlying the Microvascular Dysfunction Associated with Obesity and Insulin Resistance

Inflammatory Responses Underlying the Microvascular Dysfunction Associated with Obesity and... ABSTRACT Obesity is a growing health care problem that is increasing the incidence and morbidity of cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that obesity is associated with a systemic inflammatory response that is characterized by endothelial cell dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the activation of circulating immune cells. Adipocytes produce and release a variety of cytokines (IL‐1, TNF‐α) and cytokine‐like substances (leptin, resistin) that appear to mediate the inflammatory response that accompanies obesity. The abrogating influence of weight loss on the inflammatory response supports this contention. The insulin resistance that often accompanies obesity may also contribute to this inflammatory phenotype. Studies in experimental animals and clinical studies suggest that the microvascular dysfunction associated with pathological states, such as sepsis, is greatly exacerbated by obesity. Although the microvasculature appears to be a major target for the deleterious inflammatory consequences of obesity, relatively little attention has been devoted to characterizing the effects of obesity on inflammatory responses in different regional vascular beds and to defining the mechanisms that underlie the resultant microvascular dysfunction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Microcirculation Wiley

Inflammatory Responses Underlying the Microvascular Dysfunction Associated with Obesity and Insulin Resistance

Microcirculation, Volume 14 (4‐5) – Jun 7, 2007

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2007 Blackwell
ISSN
1073-9688
eISSN
1549-8719
DOI
10.1080/10739680701283158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Obesity is a growing health care problem that is increasing the incidence and morbidity of cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that obesity is associated with a systemic inflammatory response that is characterized by endothelial cell dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the activation of circulating immune cells. Adipocytes produce and release a variety of cytokines (IL‐1, TNF‐α) and cytokine‐like substances (leptin, resistin) that appear to mediate the inflammatory response that accompanies obesity. The abrogating influence of weight loss on the inflammatory response supports this contention. The insulin resistance that often accompanies obesity may also contribute to this inflammatory phenotype. Studies in experimental animals and clinical studies suggest that the microvascular dysfunction associated with pathological states, such as sepsis, is greatly exacerbated by obesity. Although the microvasculature appears to be a major target for the deleterious inflammatory consequences of obesity, relatively little attention has been devoted to characterizing the effects of obesity on inflammatory responses in different regional vascular beds and to defining the mechanisms that underlie the resultant microvascular dysfunction.

Journal

MicrocirculationWiley

Published: Jun 7, 2007

References

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