Inflammatory bio‐markers and cardiovascular risk prediction

Inflammatory bio‐markers and cardiovascular risk prediction Abstract. Blake GJ, Ridker PM (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA). Inflammatory bio‐markers and cardiovascular risk prediction (Review). J Intern Med 2002; 252: 283–294. Inflammatory processes are now recognized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its complications. Plasma levels of several markers of inflammation have been found to be associated with future cardiovascular risk in a variety of clinical settings. These markers include cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, pro‐atherogenic enzymes and C‐reactive protein (CRP). Initially thought of as an inactive downstream marker of the inflammatory cascade, emerging evidence suggests that CRP may be directly involved in atherogenesis, and that arterial plaque can produce CRP, independent of traditional hepatic pathways. In addition to being a strong predictor of future cardiovascular risk amongst patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, numerous studies have found that baseline levels of CRP are associated with risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and cardiovascular death amongst apparently healthy populations. The combination of measurement of a marker of inflammation with lipid testing may improve upon risk stratification based on lipid testing alone, and intensification of programmes for exercise, weight loss, and smoking cessation is recommended for those with elevated CRP levels. Further trials are needed to confirm the potential benefits of statins amongst individuals with elevated CRP levels. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Internal Medicine Wiley

Inflammatory bio‐markers and cardiovascular risk prediction

Journal of Internal Medicine, Volume 252 (4) – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0954-6820
eISSN
1365-2796
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2796.2002.01019.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Blake GJ, Ridker PM (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA). Inflammatory bio‐markers and cardiovascular risk prediction (Review). J Intern Med 2002; 252: 283–294. Inflammatory processes are now recognized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its complications. Plasma levels of several markers of inflammation have been found to be associated with future cardiovascular risk in a variety of clinical settings. These markers include cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, pro‐atherogenic enzymes and C‐reactive protein (CRP). Initially thought of as an inactive downstream marker of the inflammatory cascade, emerging evidence suggests that CRP may be directly involved in atherogenesis, and that arterial plaque can produce CRP, independent of traditional hepatic pathways. In addition to being a strong predictor of future cardiovascular risk amongst patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes, numerous studies have found that baseline levels of CRP are associated with risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and cardiovascular death amongst apparently healthy populations. The combination of measurement of a marker of inflammation with lipid testing may improve upon risk stratification based on lipid testing alone, and intensification of programmes for exercise, weight loss, and smoking cessation is recommended for those with elevated CRP levels. Further trials are needed to confirm the potential benefits of statins amongst individuals with elevated CRP levels.

Journal

Journal of Internal MedicineWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2002

References

  • Atherosclerosis – an inflammatory disease
    Ross, Ross
  • The selectins: vascular adhesion molecules
    Tedder, Tedder; Steeber, Steeber; Chen, Chen; Engel, Engel
  • P‐Selectin or intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)‐1 deficiency substantially protects against atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E‐deficient mice
    Collins, Collins; Velji, Velji; Guevara, Guevara
  • Plasma concentration of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule‐1 and subsequent cardiovascular risk
    De Lemos, De Lemos; Hennekens, Hennekens; Ridker, Ridker
  • A prospective evaluation of lipoprotein‐associated phospholipase A (2) levels and the risk of future cardiovascular events in women
    Blake, Blake; Dada, Dada; Fox, Fox; Manson, Manson; Ridker, Ridker
  • Association of C‐reactive protein and serum amyloid A with recurrent coronary events in stable patients after healing of acute myocardial infarction
    Harb, Harb; Zareba, Zareba; Moss, Moss
  • Associations of elevated interleukin‐6 and C‐reactive protein levels with mortality in the elderly
    Harris, Harris; Ferrucci, Ferrucci; Tracy, Tracy
  • Association of C‐reactive protein with markers of prevalent atherosclerotic disease
    Folsom, Folsom; Pankow, Pankow; Tracy, Tracy
  • High‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein: a novel and promising marker of coronary heart disease
    Rifai, Rifai; Ridker, Ridker
  • Absence of diurnal variation of C‐reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects
    Meier‐Ewert, Meier‐Ewert; Ridker, Ridker; Rifai, Rifai; Price, Price; Dinges, Dinges; Mullington, Mullington
  • The effect of aspirin on C‐reactive protein as a marker of risk in unstable angina
    Kennon, Kennon; Price, Price; Mills, Mills
  • Are statins anti‐inflammatory?
    Blake, Blake; Ridker, Ridker

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