Inflammation, hepatic enzymes and resistance training in individuals with metabolic risk factors

Inflammation, hepatic enzymes and resistance training in individuals with metabolic risk factors Aims Increases in inflammatory markers, hepatic enzymes and physical inactivity are associated with the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined whether inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes are correlated with traditional risk factors for MetS and studied the effects of resistance training (RT) on these emerging risk factors in individuals with a high number of metabolic risk factors (HiMF, 2.9 ± 0.8) and those with a low number of metabolic risk factors (LoMF, 0.5 ± 0.5). Methods Twenty‐eight men and 27 women aged 50.8 ± 6.5 years (mean ± sd) participated in the study. Participants were randomized to four groups, HiMF training (HiMFT), HiMF control (HiMFC), LoMF training (LoMFT) and LoMF control (LoMFC). Before and after 10 weeks of RT (3 days/week, seven exercises, three sets with intensity gradually increased from 40–50% of one repetition maximum (1RM) to 75–85% of 1RM), blood samples were obtained for the measurement of pro‐inflammatory cytokines, C‐reactive protein (CRP), γ‐glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Results At baseline, HiMF had higher interleukin‐6 (33.9%), CRP (57.1%), GGT (45.2%) and ALT (40.6%) levels, compared with LoMF (all P < 0.05). CRP, GGT and ALT correlated with the number of risk factors (r = 0.48, 0.51 and 0.57, respectively, all P < 0.01) and with other anthropometric and clinical measures (r range from 0.26 to 0.60, P < 0.05). RT did not significantly alter inflammatory markers or hepatic enzymes (all P > 0.05). Conclusions HiMF was associated with increased inflammatory markers and hepatic enzyme concentrations. RT did not reduce inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes in individuals with HiMF. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetic Medicine Wiley

Inflammation, hepatic enzymes and resistance training in individuals with metabolic risk factors

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Diabetes UK
ISSN
0742-3071
eISSN
1464-5491
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1464-5491.2009.02679.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims Increases in inflammatory markers, hepatic enzymes and physical inactivity are associated with the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined whether inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes are correlated with traditional risk factors for MetS and studied the effects of resistance training (RT) on these emerging risk factors in individuals with a high number of metabolic risk factors (HiMF, 2.9 ± 0.8) and those with a low number of metabolic risk factors (LoMF, 0.5 ± 0.5). Methods Twenty‐eight men and 27 women aged 50.8 ± 6.5 years (mean ± sd) participated in the study. Participants were randomized to four groups, HiMF training (HiMFT), HiMF control (HiMFC), LoMF training (LoMFT) and LoMF control (LoMFC). Before and after 10 weeks of RT (3 days/week, seven exercises, three sets with intensity gradually increased from 40–50% of one repetition maximum (1RM) to 75–85% of 1RM), blood samples were obtained for the measurement of pro‐inflammatory cytokines, C‐reactive protein (CRP), γ‐glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Results At baseline, HiMF had higher interleukin‐6 (33.9%), CRP (57.1%), GGT (45.2%) and ALT (40.6%) levels, compared with LoMF (all P < 0.05). CRP, GGT and ALT correlated with the number of risk factors (r = 0.48, 0.51 and 0.57, respectively, all P < 0.01) and with other anthropometric and clinical measures (r range from 0.26 to 0.60, P < 0.05). RT did not significantly alter inflammatory markers or hepatic enzymes (all P > 0.05). Conclusions HiMF was associated with increased inflammatory markers and hepatic enzyme concentrations. RT did not reduce inflammatory markers and hepatic enzymes in individuals with HiMF.

Journal

Diabetic MedicineWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2009

References

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    Rutter, Rutter; Meigs, Meigs; Sullivan, Sullivan; D’Agostino, D’Agostino; Wilson, Wilson
  • Is metabolic syndrome X an inflammatory condition
    Das, Das
  • Exercise training is not associated with improved levels of C‐reactive protein or adiponectin
    Marcell, Marcell; McAuley, McAuley; Traustadottir, Traustadottir; Reaven, Reaven
  • The anti‐inflammatory effect of exercise
    Petersen, Petersen; Pedersen, Pedersen
  • Resistance training enhances insulin‐mediated glucose disposal with minimal effect on the tumor necrosis factor‐alpha system in older hypertensives
    Reynolds, Reynolds; Supiano, Supiano; Dengel, Dengel
  • Exercise training reduces fatty acid availability and improves the insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism
    Shojaee‐Moradie, Shojaee‐Moradie; Baynes, Baynes; Pentecost, Pentecost; Bell, Bell; Thomas, Thomas; Jackson, Jackson

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