Industrial use of public sector research in advanced technologies: a comparison of biotechnology and ceramics

Industrial use of public sector research in advanced technologies: a comparison of biotechnology... Industrial use of public sector research (PSR) is characterised by considerable diversity: both the nature and extent of linkage varies according to, amongst other factors, firm size, industrial sector and research field. The study reported here aims to understand better some of this diversity by comparing two fields—biotechnology and advanced ceramics. It employs a methodology which focuses on the precise character of scientific and technological inputs (STI) which companies seek and obtain during new product development. The results reveal significant similarities between the technologies: the importance to innovation of a synthesis between formal knowledge and tacit firm‐specific skills; and the reliance on PSR for both new knowledge and new research techniques and instruments. Variance in STI flows appears to be related to the particular character of new product development in the relevant industrial sectors; differences in the development and dynamism of the technologies; and in the availability of requisite expertise and knowledge in PSR. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png R & D Management Wiley

Industrial use of public sector research in advanced technologies: a comparison of biotechnology and ceramics

R & D Management, Volume 22 (2) – Apr 1, 1992

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0033-6807
eISSN
1467-9310
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9310.1992.tb00804.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Industrial use of public sector research (PSR) is characterised by considerable diversity: both the nature and extent of linkage varies according to, amongst other factors, firm size, industrial sector and research field. The study reported here aims to understand better some of this diversity by comparing two fields—biotechnology and advanced ceramics. It employs a methodology which focuses on the precise character of scientific and technological inputs (STI) which companies seek and obtain during new product development. The results reveal significant similarities between the technologies: the importance to innovation of a synthesis between formal knowledge and tacit firm‐specific skills; and the reliance on PSR for both new knowledge and new research techniques and instruments. Variance in STI flows appears to be related to the particular character of new product development in the relevant industrial sectors; differences in the development and dynamism of the technologies; and in the availability of requisite expertise and knowledge in PSR.

Journal

R & D ManagementWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1992

References

  • The characteristics of successful innovators and technically progressive firms
    Rothwell, Rothwell

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