Induced systemic resistance in wounded rice plants

Induced systemic resistance in wounded rice plants Summary Wounding of one leaf of young rice plants caused a strong and transient accumulation of non‐conjugated (–)‐JA, followed by induction of a number of pathogenesis‐related genes, in the treated leaf. The non‐treated leaf of wounded plants that emerged after the treatment was more resistant to challenge infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr. The systemic leaf also showed a transient, but delayed accumulation of jasmonic acid. Unlike the wounded leaf, there was no accumulation of pathogenesis‐related mRNAs or proteins in the systemically protected leaf. Local application of jasmonic acid, the putative signal of the wound response, resulted in a similar degree of systemic disease resistance as wounding. The results suggest the operation of systemic, wound‐related signalling processes in rice that induce systemic disease resistance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Plant Journal Wiley

Induced systemic resistance in wounded rice plants

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0960-7412
eISSN
1365-313X
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-313X.1998.00141.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Wounding of one leaf of young rice plants caused a strong and transient accumulation of non‐conjugated (–)‐JA, followed by induction of a number of pathogenesis‐related genes, in the treated leaf. The non‐treated leaf of wounded plants that emerged after the treatment was more resistant to challenge infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr. The systemic leaf also showed a transient, but delayed accumulation of jasmonic acid. Unlike the wounded leaf, there was no accumulation of pathogenesis‐related mRNAs or proteins in the systemically protected leaf. Local application of jasmonic acid, the putative signal of the wound response, resulted in a similar degree of systemic disease resistance as wounding. The results suggest the operation of systemic, wound‐related signalling processes in rice that induce systemic disease resistance.

Journal

The Plant JournalWiley

Published: May 1, 1998

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