Individual differences matter: Commentary on “Effects of expressive writing on depressive symptoms—A meta‐analysis”

Individual differences matter: Commentary on “Effects of expressive writing on depressive... During the three‐plus decades since Pennebaker and Beall's () seminal study we have witnessed an explosion of research on expressive writing. The impact of this simple, self‐administered intervention on important outcomes ranging from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms to immune system functioning has caught the imagination of the field. Interventions based on the expressive writing (EW) paradigm have found their way into diverse clinical settings and researchers have explored benefits of EW in a variety of clinical and nonclinical contexts.A substantial body of research, including multiple meta‐analyses, supports the effectiveness of expressive writing in bringing about both physical health benefits and self‐reported psychological benefits. However, evidence for the latter category of outcomes—psychological benefits—has been less dramatic, and the number of studies reporting null or, occasionally, adverse effects of expressive writing has remained just large enough to sustain doubts about its efficacy.In this context, Reinhold, Bürkner, and Holling's () meta‐analysis is timely and important. Given burgeoning evidence for the disease burden of depression worldwide, as well as the ubiquity of depression symptoms even in healthy individuals, it is important to determine what benefits EW may have for alleviating symptoms of depression. It is perhaps especially important to determine circumstances in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice Wiley

Individual differences matter: Commentary on “Effects of expressive writing on depressive symptoms—A meta‐analysis”

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/individual-differences-matter-commentary-on-effects-of-expressive-evTVgB6lFY
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Society of Clinical Psychology
ISSN
0969-5893
eISSN
1468-2850
D.O.I.
10.1111/cpsp.12230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the three‐plus decades since Pennebaker and Beall's () seminal study we have witnessed an explosion of research on expressive writing. The impact of this simple, self‐administered intervention on important outcomes ranging from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms to immune system functioning has caught the imagination of the field. Interventions based on the expressive writing (EW) paradigm have found their way into diverse clinical settings and researchers have explored benefits of EW in a variety of clinical and nonclinical contexts.A substantial body of research, including multiple meta‐analyses, supports the effectiveness of expressive writing in bringing about both physical health benefits and self‐reported psychological benefits. However, evidence for the latter category of outcomes—psychological benefits—has been less dramatic, and the number of studies reporting null or, occasionally, adverse effects of expressive writing has remained just large enough to sustain doubts about its efficacy.In this context, Reinhold, Bürkner, and Holling's () meta‐analysis is timely and important. Given burgeoning evidence for the disease burden of depression worldwide, as well as the ubiquity of depression symptoms even in healthy individuals, it is important to determine what benefits EW may have for alleviating symptoms of depression. It is perhaps especially important to determine circumstances in

Journal

Clinical Psychology: Science and PracticeWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off