Incubation of cultured skin substitutes in reduced humidity promotes cornification in vitro and stable engraftment in athymic mice

Incubation of cultured skin substitutes in reduced humidity promotes cornification in vitro and... Cultured skin substitutes have been used successfully for adjunctive treatment of excised burns and chronic skin wounds. However, limitations inherent to all models of cultured skin include deficient barrier function in vitro, and delayed keratinization after grafting in comparison to native skin autografts. Experimental conditions for incubation of skin substitutes were tested to stimulate barrier development before grafting, and measure responses in function and stability after grafting. Cultured skin substitutes consisted of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts attached to collagen‐glycosaminoglycan biopolymer substrates. Parallel cultured skin substitutes were incubated at the air–liquid interface in ambient (48–61%) or saturated (79–91%) relative humidity, and grafted to athymic mice on culture day 14. Additional cultured skin substitutes were incubated in the experimental conditions for a total of 28 days. Cadaveric human skin and acellular biopolymer substrates served as controls. Epidermal barrier was evaluated as the change in surface hydration by surface electrical capacitance with the NOVA™ Dermal Phase Meter. Cultured skin substitutes and cadaveric skin incubated in ambient humidity had lower baseline surface electrical capacitance and less change in surface electrical capacitance than parallel samples incubated in saturated humidity at all time points in vitro. Data from healing cultured skin substitutes at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after grafting showed an earlier return to hydration levels comparable to native human skin, and more stable engraftment for skin substitutes from ambient humidity. The data indicate that cultured skin substitutes in ambient humidity have lower surface electrical capacitance and greater stability in vitro, and that they reform epidermal barrier more rapidly after grafting than cultured skin substitutes in saturated humidity. These results suggest that restoration of functional epidermis by cultured skin substitutes is stimulated by incubation in reduced humidity in vitro. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wound Repair and Regeneration Wiley

Incubation of cultured skin substitutes in reduced humidity promotes cornification in vitro and stable engraftment in athymic mice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/incubation-of-cultured-skin-substitutes-in-reduced-humidity-promotes-KOCZKsizaB
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1067-1927
eISSN
1524-475X
DOI
10.1046/j.1524-475X.1999.00226.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cultured skin substitutes have been used successfully for adjunctive treatment of excised burns and chronic skin wounds. However, limitations inherent to all models of cultured skin include deficient barrier function in vitro, and delayed keratinization after grafting in comparison to native skin autografts. Experimental conditions for incubation of skin substitutes were tested to stimulate barrier development before grafting, and measure responses in function and stability after grafting. Cultured skin substitutes consisted of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts attached to collagen‐glycosaminoglycan biopolymer substrates. Parallel cultured skin substitutes were incubated at the air–liquid interface in ambient (48–61%) or saturated (79–91%) relative humidity, and grafted to athymic mice on culture day 14. Additional cultured skin substitutes were incubated in the experimental conditions for a total of 28 days. Cadaveric human skin and acellular biopolymer substrates served as controls. Epidermal barrier was evaluated as the change in surface hydration by surface electrical capacitance with the NOVA™ Dermal Phase Meter. Cultured skin substitutes and cadaveric skin incubated in ambient humidity had lower baseline surface electrical capacitance and less change in surface electrical capacitance than parallel samples incubated in saturated humidity at all time points in vitro. Data from healing cultured skin substitutes at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after grafting showed an earlier return to hydration levels comparable to native human skin, and more stable engraftment for skin substitutes from ambient humidity. The data indicate that cultured skin substitutes in ambient humidity have lower surface electrical capacitance and greater stability in vitro, and that they reform epidermal barrier more rapidly after grafting than cultured skin substitutes in saturated humidity. These results suggest that restoration of functional epidermis by cultured skin substitutes is stimulated by incubation in reduced humidity in vitro.

Journal

Wound Repair and RegenerationWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1999

References

  • Definitions and guidelines for assessment of wounds and evaluation of healing
    Lazarus, Lazarus; Cooper, Cooper; Knighton, Knighton; Margolis, Margolis; Pecarro, Pecarro; Rodeheaver, Rodeheaver; Robson, Robson
  • Skin temperature and transepidermal water loss
    Grice, Grice; Sharratt, Sharratt; Baker, Baker
  • Guidelines for transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement
    Pinnagoda, Pinnagoda; Tupker, Tupker; Agner, Agner; Serup, Serup
  • Surface electrical capacitance as an index of epidermal barrier properties of composite skin substitutes and skin autografts
    Goretsky, Goretsky; Supp, Supp; Greenhalgh, Greenhalgh; Warden, Warden; Boyce, Boyce

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off