Increased resistance of mice to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by synbiotic administration of Bifidobacteria and transgalactosylated oligosaccharides

Increased resistance of mice to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by synbiotic... Aims: The anti‐infectious activity of Bifidobacteria in combination with transgalactosylated oligosaccharides (TOS) against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT‐2 in an opportunistic antibiotic‐induced murine infection model in mice was examined. Methods and Results: B. breve (strain Yakult) with natural resistance to streptomycin sulphate (SM, MIC: > 4 mg ml–1), when given daily at a dose of 108 cfu/mouse orally under SM treatment was constantly excreted at 1010 cfu g–1 faeces so long as SM was administered, even at 2 weeks after discontinuing administration of B. breve. Explosive intestinal growth and subsequent extra‐intestinal translocation of orally infected LT‐2 under SM treatment were inhibited by B. breve colonization, and this anti‐infectious activity was strengthened by synbiotic administration of TOS with B. breve. Comparison of anti‐Salmonella activity among several Bifidobacterium strains with natural resistance to SM revealed that strains such as B. bifidum ATCC 15696 and B. catenulatum ATCC 27539T conferred no activity, even when they reached high population levels similar those of effective strains such as strain Yakult and B. pseudocatenulatum DSM 20439. Both the increase in the concentration of organic acids and the lowered pH in the intestine due to bifidobacterial colonization correlated with the anti‐infectious activity. Moreover, the crude cecal extract of B. breve‐colonized mice exerted growth‐inhibitory activity against LT‐2 in vitro, whereas that of the ineffective B. bifidum‐colonized cecum showed much lower activity. Conclusions: Intestinal colonization by bifidobacteria given exogenously together with TOS during antibiotic treatment prevents the antibiotic‐induced disruption of colonization resistance to oral infection with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and the metabolic activity needed to produce organic acids and lower the intestinal pH is important in the anti‐infectious activity of synbiotics against enteric infection with Salmonella. Significance and Impact of the Study: These results indicate that certain bifidobacteria together with prebiotics may be used for the prophylaxis against opportunistic intestinal infections with antibiotic‐resistant pathogens. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Microbiology Wiley

Increased resistance of mice to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by synbiotic administration of Bifidobacteria and transgalactosylated oligosaccharides

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1364-5072
eISSN
1365-2672
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2672.2001.01461.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims: The anti‐infectious activity of Bifidobacteria in combination with transgalactosylated oligosaccharides (TOS) against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT‐2 in an opportunistic antibiotic‐induced murine infection model in mice was examined. Methods and Results: B. breve (strain Yakult) with natural resistance to streptomycin sulphate (SM, MIC: > 4 mg ml–1), when given daily at a dose of 108 cfu/mouse orally under SM treatment was constantly excreted at 1010 cfu g–1 faeces so long as SM was administered, even at 2 weeks after discontinuing administration of B. breve. Explosive intestinal growth and subsequent extra‐intestinal translocation of orally infected LT‐2 under SM treatment were inhibited by B. breve colonization, and this anti‐infectious activity was strengthened by synbiotic administration of TOS with B. breve. Comparison of anti‐Salmonella activity among several Bifidobacterium strains with natural resistance to SM revealed that strains such as B. bifidum ATCC 15696 and B. catenulatum ATCC 27539T conferred no activity, even when they reached high population levels similar those of effective strains such as strain Yakult and B. pseudocatenulatum DSM 20439. Both the increase in the concentration of organic acids and the lowered pH in the intestine due to bifidobacterial colonization correlated with the anti‐infectious activity. Moreover, the crude cecal extract of B. breve‐colonized mice exerted growth‐inhibitory activity against LT‐2 in vitro, whereas that of the ineffective B. bifidum‐colonized cecum showed much lower activity. Conclusions: Intestinal colonization by bifidobacteria given exogenously together with TOS during antibiotic treatment prevents the antibiotic‐induced disruption of colonization resistance to oral infection with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and the metabolic activity needed to produce organic acids and lower the intestinal pH is important in the anti‐infectious activity of synbiotics against enteric infection with Salmonella. Significance and Impact of the Study: These results indicate that certain bifidobacteria together with prebiotics may be used for the prophylaxis against opportunistic intestinal infections with antibiotic‐resistant pathogens.

Journal

Journal of Applied MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2001

References

  • Dietary calcium inhibits the intestinal colonization and translocation of Salmonella in rats
    Bovee‐Oudenhoven, Bovee‐Oudenhoven; Termont, Termont; Weerkamp, Weerkamp; Faassen‐Peters, Faassen‐Peters; Van der Meer, Van der Meer
  • Salmonellosis: host immune responses and bacterial virulence determinants
    Jones, Jones; Falkow, Falkow
  • Correlation between water‐holding capacity of different types of cellulose in vitro and gastrointestinal retention time in vivo of rats
    Kikuchi, Kikuchi; Yajima, Yajima
  • Structure determination of galacto‐oligosaccharides by pyridylamination and NMR spectroscopy
    Kimura, Kimura; Matsumoto, Matsumoto; Ishihara, Ishihara; Harada, Harada; Miyagi, Miyagi
  • Protective effect of bifidus milk on the experimental infection with Salmonella enteritidis subsp. typhimurium in conventional and gnotobiotic mice
    Silva, Silva; Bambirra, Bambirra; Oliveira, Oliveira
  • Dietary modulation of intestinal bacterial infections
    Van der Meer, Van der Meer; Bovee‐Oudenhoven, Bovee‐Oudenhoven

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