Increase your divestment effectiveness

Increase your divestment effectiveness In many large diversified corporations there is a largely prevalent habit to consider divestment decisions as ‘top secret’: information concerning potential divestitures is restricted to top management and only a handful of senior managers are involved in the decision making process. The major assumption underlying such behaviour is the fear of failure; that is, top management is concerned about involving line—generally divisional—managers in the process of making up one's mind to divest (a time consuming process as will be seen later) and searching a potential acquirer, in the fear that such involvement might work in counteractive ways and perhaps cause the abortion of the project. As a result, information is most often withheld, decisions in progress are kept secret; an ‘underground’ strategy is developed. The purpose of this article is to show that the most successful divestments are precisely those where line management's co‐operation has been elicited at very early stages and to suggest that such a participative management mode is likely to produce better results. Our research, based on the study of 14 divestments in the US and Europe (see Appendix), thus shows that the division manager is a key person on the divestment chess‐board and accomplishes varied missions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strategic Management Journal Wiley

Increase your divestment effectiveness

Strategic Management Journal, Volume 2 (2) – Apr 1, 1981

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0143-2095
eISSN
1097-0266
DOI
10.1002/smj.4250020203
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In many large diversified corporations there is a largely prevalent habit to consider divestment decisions as ‘top secret’: information concerning potential divestitures is restricted to top management and only a handful of senior managers are involved in the decision making process. The major assumption underlying such behaviour is the fear of failure; that is, top management is concerned about involving line—generally divisional—managers in the process of making up one's mind to divest (a time consuming process as will be seen later) and searching a potential acquirer, in the fear that such involvement might work in counteractive ways and perhaps cause the abortion of the project. As a result, information is most often withheld, decisions in progress are kept secret; an ‘underground’ strategy is developed. The purpose of this article is to show that the most successful divestments are precisely those where line management's co‐operation has been elicited at very early stages and to suggest that such a participative management mode is likely to produce better results. Our research, based on the study of 14 divestments in the US and Europe (see Appendix), thus shows that the division manager is a key person on the divestment chess‐board and accomplishes varied missions.

Journal

Strategic Management JournalWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1981

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