Improving efficiency of viability‐qPCR for selective detection of infectious HAV in food and water samples

Improving efficiency of viability‐qPCR for selective detection of infectious HAV in food and... IntroductionHepatitis A virus (HAV) is a small (27–32 nm), nonenveloped, and positive‐sense single‐stranded RNA virus which is excreted in faeces at levels from 106 to 1011 viruses per gram (Costafreda et al. ). Consequently, hepatitis A infection generally occurs through the faecal–oral route either by direct contact with an HAV‐infected person, ingestion of contaminated water or food, or in a lesser extent by contact with contaminated fomites (Hollinger and Emerson ). As a result of the increasing number of hepatitis A outbreaks associated with imported foods in high‐income countries (reviewed by Sánchez ), HAV has been considered as a re‐emerging foodborne public health threat (Sprenger ). Moreover, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recently estimated that there are 14 million cases and 28 000 deaths of foodborne hepatitis A worldwide every year (WHO ). Therefore, there is a great demand for rapid, specific, sensitive, accurate and standardized procedures for HAV detection in foods. Recently, a standardized RT‐qPCR‐based procedure has been developed for norovirus and HAV detection in some food matrices (ISO 15216‐1:2017). Like any other technologies, PCR‐based methods have limitations, such as discrimination of infectious and inactivated viruses that may overestimate the presence of infectious foodborne viruses. To circumvent this limitation, monoazide http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Microbiology Wiley

Improving efficiency of viability‐qPCR for selective detection of infectious HAV in food and water samples

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology
ISSN
1364-5072
eISSN
1365-2672
D.O.I.
10.1111/jam.13519
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionHepatitis A virus (HAV) is a small (27–32 nm), nonenveloped, and positive‐sense single‐stranded RNA virus which is excreted in faeces at levels from 106 to 1011 viruses per gram (Costafreda et al. ). Consequently, hepatitis A infection generally occurs through the faecal–oral route either by direct contact with an HAV‐infected person, ingestion of contaminated water or food, or in a lesser extent by contact with contaminated fomites (Hollinger and Emerson ). As a result of the increasing number of hepatitis A outbreaks associated with imported foods in high‐income countries (reviewed by Sánchez ), HAV has been considered as a re‐emerging foodborne public health threat (Sprenger ). Moreover, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recently estimated that there are 14 million cases and 28 000 deaths of foodborne hepatitis A worldwide every year (WHO ). Therefore, there is a great demand for rapid, specific, sensitive, accurate and standardized procedures for HAV detection in foods. Recently, a standardized RT‐qPCR‐based procedure has been developed for norovirus and HAV detection in some food matrices (ISO 15216‐1:2017). Like any other technologies, PCR‐based methods have limitations, such as discrimination of infectious and inactivated viruses that may overestimate the presence of infectious foodborne viruses. To circumvent this limitation, monoazide

Journal

Journal of Applied MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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