Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Towards Asylum Seekers in Australia: Demographic and Ideological Correlates

Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Towards Asylum Seekers in Australia: Demographic and Ideological... What is already known on this topicAttitudes towards asylum seekers in Australia are negative and pervasive.A range of research has revealed a variety of demographic and ideological correlates of these attitudes, although they are yet to be considered in harmony.These attitudes have been exclusively measured using self‐report (i.e., explicit measures).What this paper addsExplicit and implicit attitudes towards asylum seekers in Australia are different; this research presents the first data on implicit attitudes towards this target.Demographic correlates of these attitudes have yet to be considered in unison. This research demonstrates that gender is the most important predictor, with the relatively little considered factor of religious affiliation playing a large role.Implicit attitudes seem to be related to demographic factors, specifically religion; this implies that interventions for negative implicit attitudes and negative explicit attitudes may need to be different. This has large implications for researchers intervening with attitudes and for practitioners working with asylum‐claiming clients.Policy pertaining to the treatment of asylum seekers continues to be a contentious issue in Australia. The Australian population has reported increasingly negative attitudes toward this group across the last several decades (Haslam & Holland, ), and evidence of the negative outcomes of Australian policy on the matter http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Psychologist Wiley

Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Towards Asylum Seekers in Australia: Demographic and Ideological Correlates

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 The Australian Psychological Society
ISSN
0005-0067
eISSN
1742-9544
D.O.I.
10.1111/ap.12229
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What is already known on this topicAttitudes towards asylum seekers in Australia are negative and pervasive.A range of research has revealed a variety of demographic and ideological correlates of these attitudes, although they are yet to be considered in harmony.These attitudes have been exclusively measured using self‐report (i.e., explicit measures).What this paper addsExplicit and implicit attitudes towards asylum seekers in Australia are different; this research presents the first data on implicit attitudes towards this target.Demographic correlates of these attitudes have yet to be considered in unison. This research demonstrates that gender is the most important predictor, with the relatively little considered factor of religious affiliation playing a large role.Implicit attitudes seem to be related to demographic factors, specifically religion; this implies that interventions for negative implicit attitudes and negative explicit attitudes may need to be different. This has large implications for researchers intervening with attitudes and for practitioners working with asylum‐claiming clients.Policy pertaining to the treatment of asylum seekers continues to be a contentious issue in Australia. The Australian population has reported increasingly negative attitudes toward this group across the last several decades (Haslam & Holland, ), and evidence of the negative outcomes of Australian policy on the matter

Journal

Australian PsychologistWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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