Implementation intentions and repeated behaviour: augmenting the predictive validity of the theory of planned behaviour

Implementation intentions and repeated behaviour: augmenting the predictive validity of the... Two experiments based upon Gollwitzer's (1993) concept of implementation intentions are described. In both experiments, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intentions from Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behaviour were used to measure participants' motivation prior to an intervention in which participants made implementation intentions specifying where and when they would take a vitamin C pill each day. Behaviours were assessed by self‐report and pill count at both 10 days and 3 weeks in Experiment 1, and at 2 weeks and 5 weeks in Experiment 2. Results supported the view that participants who formed implementation intentions were less likely to miss taking a pill every day compared to controls. Evidence suggested that implementation intentions were effective because they allowed participants to pass control of behaviour to the environmental cues contained in the implementation intention. Implications of the study and some suggestions for future research are outlined. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

Implementation intentions and repeated behaviour: augmenting the predictive validity of the theory of planned behaviour

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0046-2772
eISSN
1099-0992
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1099-0992(199903/05)29:2/3<349::AID-EJSP931>3.0.CO;2-Y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two experiments based upon Gollwitzer's (1993) concept of implementation intentions are described. In both experiments, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intentions from Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behaviour were used to measure participants' motivation prior to an intervention in which participants made implementation intentions specifying where and when they would take a vitamin C pill each day. Behaviours were assessed by self‐report and pill count at both 10 days and 3 weeks in Experiment 1, and at 2 weeks and 5 weeks in Experiment 2. Results supported the view that participants who formed implementation intentions were less likely to miss taking a pill every day compared to controls. Evidence suggested that implementation intentions were effective because they allowed participants to pass control of behaviour to the environmental cues contained in the implementation intention. Implications of the study and some suggestions for future research are outlined. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

European Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1999

References

  • The theory of planned behavior: A review and avenues for further research
    Conner, Conner; Armitage, Armitage
  • Nutrient intake and supplementation in the United States (NHANES II)
    Koplan, Koplan; Annest, Annest; Layde, Layde; Rubin, Rubin
  • The theory of planned behaviour and exercise: An investigation into the role of prior behaviour, behavioural intentions and attitude variability
    Norman, Norman; Smith, Smith
  • The time interval in the intention–behaviour relationship: Meta‐analysis
    Randall, Randall; Wolff, Wolff
  • Patterns of vitamin C intake from food and supplements: Survey of an adult population in Alameda county, California
    Shapiro, Shapiro; Samuels, Samuels; Breslow, Breslow; Camacho, Camacho

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