Impacts of the swimbladder nematode Anguillicola crassus on Anguilla anguilla : variations in liver and spleen masses

Impacts of the swimbladder nematode Anguillicola crassus on Anguilla anguilla : variations in... Variations in the liver and spleen masses of the eel Anguilla anguilla were analysed in relation to the parasite load of Anguillicola crassus at autopsy (current infection by swimbladder lumen worms) and in relation to the severity of damage observed in the swimbladder (a way of assessing the intensity of past infections). None of these measures of parasite pressure were shown to account for variation in the relative liver mass, either when controlling for somatic mass or eel age. In marked contrast, a significant increase in spleen size was revealed in eels harbouring many lumen worms and also in eels with severe damage in the swimbladder. Splenic enlargement was nearly two‐fold higher among severely affected eels (harbouring more than seven lumen parasites and showing severe damage in the swimbladder) than among infection‐free eels (no lumen parasites and no pathological signs in the swimbladder). Several possible hypotheses are reviewed before arguing for an adaptive host response involving the haematological and immunological functions of the spleen. Indeed, among eels with no pathological signs in the swimbladder, the relative spleen mass was positively associated with the mass of lumen parasites, which suggests a hyper‐synthesis of blood cells by the spleen in response to the bloodsucking activity of lumen worms. Nevertheless, among eels with no lumen parasites at autopsy, there was still an increase in spleen size in relation to the severity of the swimbladder damage, which also suggests a hyper‐synthesis of splenic immune cells (lymphocytes and macrophages) in reaction to damaged tissues and particularly to larvae in the swimbladder wall. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

Impacts of the swimbladder nematode Anguillicola crassus on Anguilla anguilla : variations in liver and spleen masses

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.0022-1112.2004.00309.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Variations in the liver and spleen masses of the eel Anguilla anguilla were analysed in relation to the parasite load of Anguillicola crassus at autopsy (current infection by swimbladder lumen worms) and in relation to the severity of damage observed in the swimbladder (a way of assessing the intensity of past infections). None of these measures of parasite pressure were shown to account for variation in the relative liver mass, either when controlling for somatic mass or eel age. In marked contrast, a significant increase in spleen size was revealed in eels harbouring many lumen worms and also in eels with severe damage in the swimbladder. Splenic enlargement was nearly two‐fold higher among severely affected eels (harbouring more than seven lumen parasites and showing severe damage in the swimbladder) than among infection‐free eels (no lumen parasites and no pathological signs in the swimbladder). Several possible hypotheses are reviewed before arguing for an adaptive host response involving the haematological and immunological functions of the spleen. Indeed, among eels with no pathological signs in the swimbladder, the relative spleen mass was positively associated with the mass of lumen parasites, which suggests a hyper‐synthesis of blood cells by the spleen in response to the bloodsucking activity of lumen worms. Nevertheless, among eels with no lumen parasites at autopsy, there was still an increase in spleen size in relation to the severity of the swimbladder damage, which also suggests a hyper‐synthesis of splenic immune cells (lymphocytes and macrophages) in reaction to damaged tissues and particularly to larvae in the swimbladder wall.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2004

References

  • Effect of food on the growth of carcase, liver and ovary in female Gasterosteus aculeatus L
    Allen, Allen; Wootton, Wootton
  • The selection of suitable indices for the measurement and analysis of fish condition
    Bolger, Bolger; Connolly, Connolly
  • Effects of the digenean parasites Labratrema minimus and Cryptocotyle concavum on the growth parameters of Pomatoschistus microps and P. minutus from Southwest Wales
    Malek, Malek

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