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Impact of Late‐Season Herbicide Applications on Winter Canola Yield and Seed Quality

Impact of Late‐Season Herbicide Applications on Winter Canola Yield and Seed Quality Abbreviationsquizalofop‐P‐ethylquizalofopInterest in winter canola (Brassica napus L.) throughout Oklahoma and the Southern Great Plains has been increasing in the last decade, with land area increasing from 925 ha in 2007 to >93,000 ha in 2015 (NASS, 2015). This can be seen by the increase in canola on the national oilseed market. Currently, canola ranks third, only behind soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum L.), as the prominent oilseed crop grown in the United States (Ash, 2017). Part of the continued interest of canola within the region has been the increasing demand for a locally grown, healthy cooking oil. Growth was then further aided in 2006 when the US Food and Drug Administration certified canola as a heart healthy oil due to its lower percentage of saturated fat compared with other oils and lack of trans‐fats (Stamm et al., 2018). As a result, canola oil is currently the second‐most widely consumed vegetable oil in the United States (Ash, 2017). However, the United States still imports a large portion of canola needed for oil production from Canada. High canola imports and a shift in consumer interest has resulted in a higher demand in domestic production.In addition to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Impact of Late‐Season Herbicide Applications on Winter Canola Yield and Seed Quality

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.10.0053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abbreviationsquizalofop‐P‐ethylquizalofopInterest in winter canola (Brassica napus L.) throughout Oklahoma and the Southern Great Plains has been increasing in the last decade, with land area increasing from 925 ha in 2007 to >93,000 ha in 2015 (NASS, 2015). This can be seen by the increase in canola on the national oilseed market. Currently, canola ranks third, only behind soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum L.), as the prominent oilseed crop grown in the United States (Ash, 2017). Part of the continued interest of canola within the region has been the increasing demand for a locally grown, healthy cooking oil. Growth was then further aided in 2006 when the US Food and Drug Administration certified canola as a heart healthy oil due to its lower percentage of saturated fat compared with other oils and lack of trans‐fats (Stamm et al., 2018). As a result, canola oil is currently the second‐most widely consumed vegetable oil in the United States (Ash, 2017). However, the United States still imports a large portion of canola needed for oil production from Canada. High canola imports and a shift in consumer interest has resulted in a higher demand in domestic production.In addition to the

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References