Immunohistochemical localization of C‐reactive protein‐binding sites in human atherosclerotic aortic lesions by a modified streptavidin‐biotin‐staining method

Immunohistochemical localization of C‐reactive protein‐binding sites in human atherosclerotic... One‐step fluorescein‐conjugated polyclonal antibody technique has shown that C‐reactive protein (CRP) was located only extracellularly in human atherosclerotic lesions. In this report a more sensitive streptavidin‐biotin technique was applied to detect the localization of CRP in human athere sclerotic lesions. lmmunohistochemical staining with polyclonal and monoclonal anti‐human CRP antibodies both produced a brown color extracellularly in the necrotic lesions, and intracelluarly in CD68+ foam cells. The latter suggests an uptake of CRP‐lipid complexes by macro‐phages. The staining is human CRP‐specific because it was eliminated by preabsorption of the monoclonal antibody with pure human CRP, or by substitution of the primary antibody with non‐immune rabbit serum. By overlaid CRP‐binding study, a positive stain was observed on intimal smooth muscle cells and foam cells, suggesting that they have CRP‐binding sites unless the CRP‐binding activity was generated de novo through the fixation procedure. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that CRP may facilitate the uptake of lipids by macrophages accumulating in atherosclerotic lesions. Further, CRP might participate in cytolysis, which enlarges the necrotic area, and/or in phagocytosis that scavenges the necrotic tissue. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pathology International Wiley

Immunohistochemical localization of C‐reactive protein‐binding sites in human atherosclerotic aortic lesions by a modified streptavidin‐biotin‐staining method

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1995 Cambridge Philosophical Society
ISSN
1320-5463
eISSN
1440-1827
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1440-1827.1995.tb03515.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One‐step fluorescein‐conjugated polyclonal antibody technique has shown that C‐reactive protein (CRP) was located only extracellularly in human atherosclerotic lesions. In this report a more sensitive streptavidin‐biotin technique was applied to detect the localization of CRP in human athere sclerotic lesions. lmmunohistochemical staining with polyclonal and monoclonal anti‐human CRP antibodies both produced a brown color extracellularly in the necrotic lesions, and intracelluarly in CD68+ foam cells. The latter suggests an uptake of CRP‐lipid complexes by macro‐phages. The staining is human CRP‐specific because it was eliminated by preabsorption of the monoclonal antibody with pure human CRP, or by substitution of the primary antibody with non‐immune rabbit serum. By overlaid CRP‐binding study, a positive stain was observed on intimal smooth muscle cells and foam cells, suggesting that they have CRP‐binding sites unless the CRP‐binding activity was generated de novo through the fixation procedure. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that CRP may facilitate the uptake of lipids by macrophages accumulating in atherosclerotic lesions. Further, CRP might participate in cytolysis, which enlarges the necrotic area, and/or in phagocytosis that scavenges the necrotic tissue.

Journal

Pathology InternationalWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1995

References

  • C‐reactive protein and the acute phase response
    Ballou, Ballou; Kushner, Kushner
  • A cell attachment peptide from human C‐reactive protein
    Fernandez, Fernandez; Mullenix, Mullenix; Christner, Christner; Mortensen, Mortensen
  • Immunohistochemical studies of C‐reactive protein and apolipoprotein B in inflammatory and arterial lesions
    Rowe, Rowe; Walker, Walker; Bowyer, Bowyer; Soutar, Soutar; Smith, Smith; Pepys, Pepys
  • A monoclonal antibody against alpha‐smooth muscle actin: A new probe for smooth muscle differentiation
    Skalli, Skalli; Ropraz, Ropraz; Trzeciak, Trzeciak; Benzonan, Benzonan; Gillessen, Gillessen; Gabbiani, Gabbiani
  • Pentraxin‐chromatin interactions: Serum amyloid P component specifically displaces H1‐type histones and solubilizes native long chromatin
    Butler, Butler; Tennent, Tennent; Pepys, Pepys

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