Immunofluorescent detection of igg at the dermal‐epidermal junction in patients with apparent primary fibrositis syndrome

Immunofluorescent detection of igg at the dermal‐epidermal junction in patients with apparent... IMMUNOFLUORESCENT DETECTION O F IgG AT THE DERMAL-EPIDERMAL JUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH APPARENT PRIMARY FIBROSITIS SYNDROME XAVIER J. CAR0 Primary fibrositis syndrome (PFS) is a common rheumatologic disorder whose etiology remains unknown. It is characterized by complaints of widespread aching, soft tissue tenderness, and a number of associated constitutional symptoms (1,2). By definition, the syndrome is found in the absence of standard laboratory markers for rheumatic disease. This lack of associated laboratory abnormalities has made the identification and study of affected patients difficult. During the course of examining patients with PFS we have frequently observed a reticular skin discoloration (RSD). Since similar skin changes have been seen in association with a number of immunerelated diseases (3), it was postulated that the study of skin from patients with PFS might provide a means of better understanding this disorder. Therefore, 25 patients with apparent PFS were studied for the incidence of RSD and for immunofluorescent evidence of immunoglobulin deposition at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ). The results are presented in this report. __ PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients. Twenty-five consecutive patients who apparently satisfied criteria for the diagnosis of PFS were studied. The criteria, suggested by Smythe (1) and modified by Bennett http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthritis & Rheumatology Wiley

Immunofluorescent detection of igg at the dermal‐epidermal junction in patients with apparent primary fibrositis syndrome

Arthritis & Rheumatology, Volume 27 (10) – Oct 1, 1984

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American College of Rheumatology
ISSN
0004-3591
eISSN
1529-0131
DOI
10.1002/art.1780271014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IMMUNOFLUORESCENT DETECTION O F IgG AT THE DERMAL-EPIDERMAL JUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH APPARENT PRIMARY FIBROSITIS SYNDROME XAVIER J. CAR0 Primary fibrositis syndrome (PFS) is a common rheumatologic disorder whose etiology remains unknown. It is characterized by complaints of widespread aching, soft tissue tenderness, and a number of associated constitutional symptoms (1,2). By definition, the syndrome is found in the absence of standard laboratory markers for rheumatic disease. This lack of associated laboratory abnormalities has made the identification and study of affected patients difficult. During the course of examining patients with PFS we have frequently observed a reticular skin discoloration (RSD). Since similar skin changes have been seen in association with a number of immunerelated diseases (3), it was postulated that the study of skin from patients with PFS might provide a means of better understanding this disorder. Therefore, 25 patients with apparent PFS were studied for the incidence of RSD and for immunofluorescent evidence of immunoglobulin deposition at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ). The results are presented in this report. __ PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients. Twenty-five consecutive patients who apparently satisfied criteria for the diagnosis of PFS were studied. The criteria, suggested by Smythe (1) and modified by Bennett

Journal

Arthritis & RheumatologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1984

References

  • The specificity and clinical usefulness of the lupus band test
    Harrist, Harrist; Mihm, Mihm
  • In vitro demonstration of a particular affinity of glomerular basement membrane and collagen for DNA: a possible basis for a local formation of DNA‐anti‐DNA complexes in systemic lupus erythematosus
    Izui, Izui; Lambert, Lambert; Miescher, Miescher

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