Immigrants in the Community: New Opportunities, New Struggles

Immigrants in the Community: New Opportunities, New Struggles The world is changing around us. Or, I should say, the world is coming to us. The United States, Canada, Europe, Australia: all of these countries and regions are undergoing rapid demographic change as immigrants and refugees arrive to create new lives ( Cornelius, Tsuda, Martin, & Hollifield, 2004 ). During the 1990s in the United States, for example, the immigrant population grew by more than 50% ( Singer, 2004 ). Since 1970, the number of immigrants living in the United States has more than tripled, from 9.6 million to 28.4 million ( Camarota, 2001 ). In the United States, 70% of the annual population increase is now attributable to growth in immigrant populations, whether from newcomers or from the expansion of existing populations ( Bean & Stevens, 2003 ). How has social science responded to these changes? For many decades, psychology has attended to cultural differences through the subdiscipline of cross‐cultural psychology. But cross‐cultural psychology has largely been construed as the comparison of cultures in different, often very distant, places. With immigrants and refugees, the cultures are in the same place, in the self‐same community. My work as a social psychologist has gravitated toward examining the immigrant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy Wiley

Immigrants in the Community: New Opportunities, New Struggles

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1529-7489
eISSN
1530-2415
DOI
10.1111/j.1530-2415.2007.00147.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The world is changing around us. Or, I should say, the world is coming to us. The United States, Canada, Europe, Australia: all of these countries and regions are undergoing rapid demographic change as immigrants and refugees arrive to create new lives ( Cornelius, Tsuda, Martin, & Hollifield, 2004 ). During the 1990s in the United States, for example, the immigrant population grew by more than 50% ( Singer, 2004 ). Since 1970, the number of immigrants living in the United States has more than tripled, from 9.6 million to 28.4 million ( Camarota, 2001 ). In the United States, 70% of the annual population increase is now attributable to growth in immigrant populations, whether from newcomers or from the expansion of existing populations ( Bean & Stevens, 2003 ). How has social science responded to these changes? For many decades, psychology has attended to cultural differences through the subdiscipline of cross‐cultural psychology. But cross‐cultural psychology has largely been construed as the comparison of cultures in different, often very distant, places. With immigrants and refugees, the cultures are in the same place, in the self‐same community. My work as a social psychologist has gravitated toward examining the immigrant

Journal

Analyses of Social Issues & Public PolicyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2007

References

  • Issues of curriculum and community for first generation Asian Americans in college
    Kiang, Kiang
  • Southeast Asian women in Lowell: Family relations, gender roles and community concerns.
    Pho, Pho; Mulvey, Mulvey

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