Imaging of amyloid burden and distribution in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Imaging of amyloid burden and distribution in cerebral amyloid angiopathy Objective Cerebrovascular deposition of β‐amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)) is a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke and a likely contributor to vascular cognitive impairment. We evaluated positron emission tomographic imaging with the β‐amyloid–binding compound Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) as a potential noninvasive method for detection of CAA. We hypothesized that amyloid deposition would be observed with PiB in CAA, and based on the occipital predilection of CAA pathology and associated hemorrhages, that specific PiB retention would be disproportionately greater in occipital lobes. Methods We compared specific cortical PiB retention in 6 nondemented subjects diagnosed with probable CAA with 15 healthy control subjects and 9 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results All CAA and AD subjects were PiB‐positive, both by distribution volume ratio measurements and by visual inspection of positron emission tomographic images. Global cortical PiB retention was significantly increased in CAA (distribution volume ratio 1.18 ± 0.06) relative to healthy control subjects (1.04 ± 0.10; p = 0.0009), but was lower in CAA than in AD subjects (1.41 ± 0.17; p = 0.002). The occipital‐to‐global PiB ratio, however, was significantly greater in CAA than in AD subjects (0.99 ± 0.07 vs 0.86 ± 0.05; p = 0.003). Interpretation We conclude that PiB‐positron emission tomography can detect cerebrovascular β‐amyloid and may serve as a method for identifying the extent of CAA in living subjects. Ann Neurol 2007 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.21164
pmid
17683091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective Cerebrovascular deposition of β‐amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)) is a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke and a likely contributor to vascular cognitive impairment. We evaluated positron emission tomographic imaging with the β‐amyloid–binding compound Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) as a potential noninvasive method for detection of CAA. We hypothesized that amyloid deposition would be observed with PiB in CAA, and based on the occipital predilection of CAA pathology and associated hemorrhages, that specific PiB retention would be disproportionately greater in occipital lobes. Methods We compared specific cortical PiB retention in 6 nondemented subjects diagnosed with probable CAA with 15 healthy control subjects and 9 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results All CAA and AD subjects were PiB‐positive, both by distribution volume ratio measurements and by visual inspection of positron emission tomographic images. Global cortical PiB retention was significantly increased in CAA (distribution volume ratio 1.18 ± 0.06) relative to healthy control subjects (1.04 ± 0.10; p = 0.0009), but was lower in CAA than in AD subjects (1.41 ± 0.17; p = 0.002). The occipital‐to‐global PiB ratio, however, was significantly greater in CAA than in AD subjects (0.99 ± 0.07 vs 0.86 ± 0.05; p = 0.003). Interpretation We conclude that PiB‐positron emission tomography can detect cerebrovascular β‐amyloid and may serve as a method for identifying the extent of CAA in living subjects. Ann Neurol 2007

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2007

References

  • Imaging brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease with Pittsburgh Compound‐B
    Klunk, WE; Engler, H; Nordberg, A
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the elderly
    Tomonaga, M
  • Spatial clustering of hemorrhages in probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy
    Rosand, J; Muzikansky, A; Kumar, A
  • [11C]PIB in a nondemented population: potential antecedent marker of Alzheimer disease
    Mintun, MA; Larossa, GN; Sheline, YI
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and intracerebral hemorrhage with special reference to the pons
    Kyriakides, T; Silbert, PL; Kakulas, BA
  • Automated anatomical labeling of activations in SPM using a macroscopic anatomical parcellation of the MNI MRI single‐subject brain
    Tzourio‐Mazoyer, N; Landeau, B; Papathanassiou, D
  • Alzheimer's disease: areal and laminar pathology in the occipital isocortex
    Braak, H; Braak, E; Kalus, P
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, white matter lesions and Alzheimer encephalopathy—a histopathological assessment
    Haglund, M; Englund, E

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