Identification of the species of origin of fresh, cooked and canned meat and meat products using antisera to thermostable muscle antigens by ouchterlony's double diffusion test

Identification of the species of origin of fresh, cooked and canned meat and meat products using... Antisera to thermostable muscle antigens (TMA) from 14 species of bovidae were raised in goats and/or sheep. To achieve species specificity the antisera were absorbed with serum from the other species. While the absorbed antisera to TMA of buffalo, impala, eland, waterbuck, wildebeest and oryx were rendered specific, the antiserum to cattle TMA cross‐reacted with buffalo fresh meat antigens (FMA) and cooked meat antigens (CMA) but not with buffalo thermostable muscle antigens. Fresh and cooked muscle antigens from these two species could be differentiated by the antiserum to buffalo TMA. A similar approach was used to differentiate the FMA, CMA, and TMA of kongoni, topi and wildebeest. Antiserum to cattle TMA proved useful in detecting the presence of beef meat in meat products that had undergone commercial sterilisation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture Wiley

Identification of the species of origin of fresh, cooked and canned meat and meat products using antisera to thermostable muscle antigens by ouchterlony's double diffusion test

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
ISSN
0022-5142
eISSN
1097-0010
D.O.I.
10.1002/jsfa.2740370210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Antisera to thermostable muscle antigens (TMA) from 14 species of bovidae were raised in goats and/or sheep. To achieve species specificity the antisera were absorbed with serum from the other species. While the absorbed antisera to TMA of buffalo, impala, eland, waterbuck, wildebeest and oryx were rendered specific, the antiserum to cattle TMA cross‐reacted with buffalo fresh meat antigens (FMA) and cooked meat antigens (CMA) but not with buffalo thermostable muscle antigens. Fresh and cooked muscle antigens from these two species could be differentiated by the antiserum to buffalo TMA. A similar approach was used to differentiate the FMA, CMA, and TMA of kongoni, topi and wildebeest. Antiserum to cattle TMA proved useful in detecting the presence of beef meat in meat products that had undergone commercial sterilisation.

Journal

Journal of the Science of Food and AgricultureWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1986

References

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