Identification of a potent and highly efficacious, yet slowly desensitizing CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist

Identification of a potent and highly efficacious, yet slowly desensitizing CB1 cannabinoid... The relationship of agonist efficacy to the rate of G protein‐coupled receptor signaling desensitization is controversial. Expressing inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) in Xenopus oocytes, we have devised a signaling assay that clearly identifies CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists with low intrinsic efficacy. In this assay, the synthetic CB1 agonists, AM411, AM782, AM1902, AM2233 and WIN55,212‐2 and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2‐arachidonoyl ester, were full agonists. The synthetic CB1 agonist AM356 (methanandamide), the endogenous cannabinoids, anandamide and 2‐arachidonoyl ether, and the phytocannabinoid, Δ9THC, were partial agonists. The rate of desensitization of CB1 was independent of agonist efficacy. WIN55,212‐2, AM782, AM1902, AM2233, and 2‐arachidonoyl glycerol ester all desensitized quickly, with desensitization rates varying from 14% min−1 to 10% min−1. AM356, AM411, anandamide, and Δ9THC all desensitized considerably slower, at a rate of 5% min−1. Despite high potency and efficacy, AM411 desensitized as slowly as anandamide and Δ9THC. CB1 agonist efficacy and rate of desensitization are not necessarily related. British Journal of Pharmacology (2004) 142, 495–500. doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0705792 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Pharmacology Wiley

Identification of a potent and highly efficacious, yet slowly desensitizing CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2004 British Pharmacological Society
ISSN
0007-1188
eISSN
1476-5381
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjp.0705792
pmid
15148260
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship of agonist efficacy to the rate of G protein‐coupled receptor signaling desensitization is controversial. Expressing inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) in Xenopus oocytes, we have devised a signaling assay that clearly identifies CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists with low intrinsic efficacy. In this assay, the synthetic CB1 agonists, AM411, AM782, AM1902, AM2233 and WIN55,212‐2 and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2‐arachidonoyl ester, were full agonists. The synthetic CB1 agonist AM356 (methanandamide), the endogenous cannabinoids, anandamide and 2‐arachidonoyl ether, and the phytocannabinoid, Δ9THC, were partial agonists. The rate of desensitization of CB1 was independent of agonist efficacy. WIN55,212‐2, AM782, AM1902, AM2233, and 2‐arachidonoyl glycerol ester all desensitized quickly, with desensitization rates varying from 14% min−1 to 10% min−1. AM356, AM411, anandamide, and Δ9THC all desensitized considerably slower, at a rate of 5% min−1. Despite high potency and efficacy, AM411 desensitized as slowly as anandamide and Δ9THC. CB1 agonist efficacy and rate of desensitization are not necessarily related. British Journal of Pharmacology (2004) 142, 495–500. doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0705792

Journal

British Journal of PharmacologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2004

References

  • Activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK1) by co‐expressed rat brain cannabinoid receptors in Xenopus oocytes
    HENRY, HENRY; CHAVKIN, CHAVKIN
  • Cross‐tolerance between delta‐9‐tetrahydrocannabinol and the cannabimimetic agents, CP 55,940, WIN 55,212‐2 and anandamide
    PERTWEE, PERTWEE; STEVENSON, STEVENSON; GRIFFIN, GRIFFIN
  • Despite substantial degradation, 2‐arachidonoylglycerol is a potent full efficacy agonist mediating CB(1) receptor‐dependent G‐protein activation in rat cerebellar membranes
    SAVINAINEN, SAVINAINEN; JARVINEN, JARVINEN; LAINE, LAINE; LAITINEN, LAITINEN

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